Bauple, Queensland

Bauple is a town and locality in the Fraser Coast Region, Queensland, Australia.[2][3] In the 2011 census, Bauple had a population of 732 people.[1]

Geography

Sugarcane workers in the canefields in the Bauple district, circa 1920

Bauple is principally flat farming land (elevation 50 metres) with rising to 450 metres in the west of the locality with some hills (elevation 150 metres) in the north-east. The town is located centrally within the locality. The Bruce Highway passes through the location from south to north, bypassing the town to the east. The town is now accessed Bauple Drive, the former route of the Bruce Highway before the town was bypassed.[4]

Sugarcane is the major crop in the area.[5]

History

The town was originally called Raby but the name was changed to Bauple on 20 November 1896, named after Mount Bauple. Bauple is believed to be derived from an Aboriginal word baupval in the Kabi language referring to a frilled lizard. In the Dreamtime, the spirit of the lizard guarded the sacred place on the mountain where stone axes were obtained.[2][6]

In 1858 bauple nuts were discovered[by whom?] in Bauple; they are now known as macadamia nuts.[5]

The Mount Bauple sugar mill was established in 1896; it was the largest in the district. It closed in 1951, as the sugarcane was then being sent to mills in Nambour and Maryborough.[7][8]

Raby State School opened on 8 July 1901 with 58 students. It was renamed Bauple State School on 16 May 1935.[9][10][11]

Education

The Bauple State School is a co-education government primary school (P-6) located at 44 Forestry Road. In 2019 Bauple school has 34 students and 3 teachers, a thriving P&C and after school activities for kids at local Recreation Grounds. https://baupless.eq.edu.au/Pages/default.aspx

Attractions

Bauple Historical & Cultural Centre, 2010

The Mount Bauple Museum is operated by the Mount Bauple and District Historical Society. One exhibit is a crocodile skin from a crocodile found in the Mary River near Owanyilla in 1964. The society have also restored a 1907 Fowler-built locomotive used at the Isis Sugar Mill, similar to one used at the Mount Bauple mill.[12]

There is a self-guided heritage trail through the town passing 24 historic sites.[12]

Events

The Bauple Nut Bash is held annually in the Bauple Recreation Grounds.[5][13]

Notable people

Notable people who come from or have resided in Bauple include:

References

  1. ^ a b Australian Bureau of Statistics (31 October 2012). "Bauple (SSC)". 2011 Census QuickStats. Retrieved 5 November 2016. Edit this at Wikidata
  2. ^ a b "Bauple - town (entry 43474)". Queensland Place Names. Queensland Government. Retrieved 5 November 2016.
  3. ^ "Bauple - locality (entry 46625)". Queensland Place Names. Queensland Government. Retrieved 5 November 2016.
  4. ^ "Queensland Globe". State of Queensland. Retrieved 5 November 2016.
  5. ^ a b c "Bauple". Our Fraser Coast. Fraser Coast Regional Council. 2014. Archived from the original on 6 November 2016. Retrieved 6 November 2016. Cite uses deprecated parameter |dead-url= (help)
  6. ^ Barnard, Trish (14 October 2010). "Curiosity: knowledge through the landscape". Queensland Historical Atlas. University of Queensland. Retrieved 6 November 2016.
  7. ^ "Tiaro Shire". Queensland Places. Centre for the Government of Queensland, University of Queensland. Retrieved 5 November 2016.[permanent dead link]
  8. ^ "Mount Bauple Central Mill". Bauple Museum. Retrieved 6 November 2016.
  9. ^ Queensland Family History Society (2010), Queensland schools past and present (Version 1.01 ed.), Queensland Family History Society, ISBN 978-1-921171-26-0
  10. ^ "Opening and closing dates of Queensland Schools". Queensland Government. Retrieved 5 November 2016.
  11. ^ "Agency ID4825, Bauple State School". Queensland State Archives. Retrieved 6 November 2016.
  12. ^ a b "Mt Bauple and District Historical Society Cultural Centre and Museum". Our Fraser Coast. Fraser Coast Regional Council. Archived from the original on 6 November 2016. Retrieved 6 November 2016. Cite uses deprecated parameter |dead-url= (help)
  13. ^ Bowes, Susan. "Bauple Nut Bash". Weekend Notes. Retrieved 6 November 2016.

Further reading

External links