The Soliloquies of Augustine is a two-book document written by the 4th-century Roman Catholic theologian Augustine of Hippo.[1]

The book has the form of an "inner dialogue" in which questions are posed, discussions take place and answers are provided, leading to self-knowledge.[2] The first book begins with an inner dialogue which seeks to know a soul. In the second book it becomes clear that the soul Augustine wants to get to know is his own.[3]

A translation of the first half of the Soliloquies into Old English is attributed to Alfred the Great, where it is known is known as the Blostman ('bloom') or Anthology.

References

  1. ^ Soliloquies: Augustine's Inner Dialogue by Boniface Ramsey 2000 ISBN 978-1-56548-142-8 page 1
  2. ^ Augustine's Inner Dialogue: The Philosophical Soliloquy in Late Antiquity by Brian Stock 2010 ISBN 978-0-521-19031-2 page 6
  3. ^ The Cambridge companion to Augustine by Eleonore Stump, Norman Kretzmann 2001 ISBN 0-521-65985-X page 76

External links