Shorncliffe is a coastal north-eastern suburb in the City of Brisbane, Queensland, Australia.[3] It is on the shore of Bramble Bay, part of Moreton Bay. In the 2016 census, Shorncliffe had a population of 1,870 people.[1] The suburb attracts visitors to its historic Shorncliffe pier, and Lovers Walk, a walking path along the coastline between Shorncliffe and neighbouring Sandgate.

Geography

Robert Dixon's 1842 Survey of Moreton Bay

Shorncliffe is situated in Brisbane's northeastern suburbs on Bramble Bay, part of Moreton Bay.

Shorncliffe is bounded to the north, north-east and east by Bramble Bay and to the south-east, south, and south-west by Cabbage Tree Creek (27°19′54″S 153°05′00″E / 27.3316°S 153.0832°E / -27.3316; 153.0832 (Cabbage Tree Creek)),[4] which enters the bay at Cabbage Tree Point (27°19′43″S 153°05′16″E / 27.3286°S 153.0877°E / -27.3286; 153.0877 (Cabbage Tree Head)).[5] The only land boundary is to the neighbouring suburb of Sandgate and all land transport to Shorncliffe must go via Sandgate.[6]

Shorncliffe railway station in Railway Avenue (27°19′37″S 153°04′50″E / 27.3269°S 153.0806°E / -27.3269; 153.0806 (Shorncliffe railway station)) is the terminus of the Shorncliffe railway line (originally known as the Sandgate railway line).[7]

History

Historical 19th century Shorncliffe pier in 2014

Aboriginal people called the area Warra, meaning an expanse of water.[8]

Cabbage Tree Creek appears on Robert Dixon's 1842 survey of Moreton Bay.[9]

The town was named Sandgate by James Burnett, an early surveyor in the region after the seaside town of Sandgate in Kent, England.[10][11] Sandgate in Kent had a military camp, Shorncliffe Army Camp, on top of the cliffs adjacent to it. Burnett named the cliffs Shorncliffe after the camp in Kent, due to the similiarity of the cliffs. Historically Shorncliffe was regarded as a neighbourhood within Sandgate (which was initially as the independent Town of Sandgate and, from 1925, as a suburb within the City of Brisbane). On 11 August 1975, Shorncliffe became a separate suburb within the City of Brisbane.[12]

The first Shorncliffe pier was built in 1879. It was built by local hotel proprietor William Deagon to attract ferries coming from Brisbane to Sandgate to disembark passengers at Shorncliffe too. It was replaced with a longer pier built from 1883 to 1884, which was further extended to facilitate docking at low tide.[13] Although the last ferry to Shorncliffe was in 1928, it remained a popular with holidaymakers.[14]

Sandgate Golf Club foundation committee, 1921

In December 1879, allotments in the Town of Sandgate were auctioned by John Cameron.[15][16] A map advertising the auction shows allotments bordered by Friday, Yundah and Kate Streets, now in Shorncliffe. A map advertising the auction states the land available was subdivisions 1 to 14, of allotments 8, 9, 10 and part of 7, Sec. 3, Town of Sandgate.[17]

A Church of England was built in Signal Row on the corner of Yundah Street (27°19′24″S 153°04′50″E / 27.3234°S 153.0806°E / -27.3234; 153.0806 (St Nicolas' Anglican Church (site))), then the centre of the developing town.[18] It was opened and dedicated on Sunday 12 December 1880 by Bishop Matthew Hale.[19] It was a timber church 35 by 20 feet (10.7 by 6.1 m) and able to accommodate 150 peope. It was designed by architect FDG Stanley and built by contractors Woodward and Betts of Brisbane.[20][21] In September 1886 it was announced that it would be dedicated to St Nicolas, the patron saint of sailors and sea-farers, a common practice in seaside towns.[22] In 1887 it was enlarged which involved re-orienting the building on the block so the chancel was to the south rather than to the original east. In 1930 the undercroft was enclosed with bricks to form a church wall. The church closed in 1988.[23] The Queensland Government purchased the church and incorporated it into Shorncliffe State School but subsequently demolished it due to extensive termite damage. Its stained glass windows were preserved and are now in St Margaret's Anglican Church at Sandgate.[24]

Shorncliffe Infants State School opened on 28 January 1919 in the old court house beside the police station. It catered for children up to 8 years old. In 1928 it became Shorncliffe State School providing a full primary school service.[25][26]

The Sandgate Golf Club commenced in 1921 with the official opening of its 9-hole course on 25 November 1922, having obtained a 21-year lease of the site from the Sandgate Town Council for a nominal rental as the Council believed that the golf course would be of lasting benefit.[27][28][29]

St Patrick's College opened on 21 January 1952.[30]

In March 2012, the Shorncliffe pier was closed for public safety after the discovery of damage done by marine borers and an engineering report revealed the pier could not be saved.[31][32] The Brisbane City Council demolished it and replaced it with a new pier, designed to be almost identical to the old pier. The new pier opened on 25 March 2016.[33][34]

In the 2016 census, Shorncliffe had a population of 1,870 people.[1]

Heritage listings

Shorncliffe has a number of heritage-listed sites, including:

Education

Shorncliffe State School is a government primary (Prep-6) school for boys and girls at Yundah Street (27°19′25″S 153°04′51″E / 27.3237°S 153.0809°E / -27.3237; 153.0809 (Shorncliffe State School)).[56][57] In 2018, the school had an enrolment of 345 students with 29 teachers (23 full-time equivalent) and 12 non-teaching staff (8 full-time equivalent).[58]

St Patrick's College is a Catholic primary and secondary (5-12) school for boys at 60 Park Parade (27°19′24″S 153°05′00″E / 27.3234°S 153.0834°E / -27.3234; 153.0834 (St Patrick's College)).[56][59] In 2018, the school had an enrolment of 1,325 students with 97 teachers (95 full-time equivalent) and 70 non-teaching staff (62 full-time equivalent).[58]

There is no government secondary school in Shorncliffe. The nearest government secondary school is Sandgate District State High School in Deagon to the west.[6]

Facilities

Shorncliffe pier from Lovers Walk between Shorncliffe and Sandgate

The Sandgate Golf Club is located in Allpass Parade.[60]

The Sandgate sub-branch of the Queensland Country Women's Association meets at the Volunteer Marine Rescue Centre at 95 Allpass Parade.[61]

Attractions

New Shorncliffe pier in 2020

Shorncliffe is a popular Brisbane destination due to its coastline, the historical Shorncliffe pier, which is one of the longest recreational piers in Australia, Lovers Walk, a walking track along the coastline between Shorncliffe and neighbouring Sandgate as well as Moora Park and Beach, which includes a dog off-leash beach.

Events

At times Shorncliffe has different festivals, including The Blue Water Festival whereby that start of the Brisbane to Gladstone yacht race begins from the opening of The Cabbage Tree Creek.

Demographics

In the 2011 census, the population of Shorncliffe was 1,914, 49.3% female and 50.7% male.

The median age of the Shorncliffe population was 41 years, 4 years above the Australian median.

78% of people living in Shorncliffe were born in Australia, compared to the national average of 69.8%; the next most common countries of birth were England 5.6%, New Zealand 5%, Scotland 0.8%, United States of America 0.7%, Ireland 0.7%.

92.4% of people spoke only English at home; the next most common languages were 0.8% German, 0.5% French, 0.4% Japanese, 0.3% Dutch, 0.3% Serbian.

Gallery

References

  1. ^ a b c Australian Bureau of Statistics (27 June 2017). "Shorncliffe (SSC)". 2016 Census QuickStats. Retrieved 20 October 2018. Edit this at Wikidata
  2. ^ "Deagon Ward". Brisbane City Council. Brisbane City Council. Archived from the original on 9 March 2017. Retrieved 12 March 2017.
  3. ^ "Shorncliffe - suburb in City of Brisbane (entry 41704)". Queensland Place Names. Queensland Government. Retrieved 7 July 2020.
  4. ^ "Cabbage Tree Creek - watercourse in City of Brisbane (entry 5610)". Queensland Place Names. Queensland Government. Retrieved 7 July 2020.
  5. ^ "Cabbage Tree Head - cape in City of Brisbane (entry 5631)". Queensland Place Names. Queensland Government. Retrieved 7 July 2020.
  6. ^ a b "Queensland Globe". State of Queensland. Retrieved 20 July 2020.
  7. ^ "Shorncliffe - railway station in the City of Brisbane (entry 30772)". Queensland Place Names. Queensland Government. Retrieved 20 July 2020.
  8. ^ Gregory, Helen; Dianne Mclay (2010). Building Brisbane's History: Structure, Sculptures, Stories and Secrets. Warriewood, New South Wales: Woodslane Press. p. 150. ISBN 9781921606199.
  9. ^ Dixon, Robert (1842). "Robert Dixon's 1842 Survey of Moreton Bay". Queensland Government. Archived from the original on 20 July 2020. Retrieved 20 July 2020.
  10. ^ "Sandgate - suburb in City of Brisbane (entry 41703)". Queensland Place Names. Queensland Government. Retrieved 26 January 2020.
  11. ^ Gregory, Helen; Dianne Mclay (2010). Building Brisbane's History: Structure, Sculptures, Stories and Secrets. Warriewood, New South Wales: Woodslane Press. ISBN 9781921606199.
  12. ^ "Shorncliffe - suburb in the City of Brisbane (entry 41704)". Queensland Place Names. Queensland Government. Retrieved 17 July 2020.
  13. ^ Gregory, Helen; Dianne Mclay (2010). Building Brisbane's History: Structure, Sculptures, Stories and Secrets. Warriewood, New South Wales: Woodslane Press. p. 150. ISBN 9781921606199.
  14. ^ Daryl Passmore (22 April 2012). "Shorncliffe Pier protest gains speed with pledge from Lord Mayor Graham Quirk". The Sunday Mail. News Queensland. Retrieved 4 June 2012.
  15. ^ "Classified Advertising". The Brisbane Courier. XXXIV (3, 901). Queensland, Australia. 18 November 1879. p. 4. Retrieved 29 October 2019 – via National Library of Australia.
  16. ^ "ABSTRACT OF SALES BY AUCTION THIS DAY". The Brisbane Courier. XXXV (3, 912). Queensland, Australia. 1 December 1879. p. 2. Retrieved 29 October 2019 – via National Library of Australia.
  17. ^ "Plan of subdivisions 1 to 14, of allotments 8, 9, 10 and part of 7, Sec. 3, town of Sandgate". 1879. hdl:10462/deriv/459792. Cite journal requires |journal= (help)
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  22. ^ "Local Items". . 1, (38). Queensland, Australia. 25 September 1886. p. 5. Retrieved 29 July 2020 – via National Library of Australia.CS1 maint: extra punctuation (link)
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  25. ^ Queensland Family History Society (2010), Queensland schools past and present (Version 1.01 ed.), Queensland Family History Society, ISBN 978-1-921171-26-0
  26. ^ "History". Shorncliffe State School. 13 February 2020. Archived from the original on 20 July 2020. Retrieved 20 July 2020.
  27. ^ "Sandgate Golf Club". Archived from the original on 23 October 2014. Retrieved 23 October 2014.
  28. ^ "GOLF". The Brisbane Courier. National Library of Australia. 11 November 1922. p. 17. Retrieved 23 October 2014.
  29. ^ "GOLF". The Brisbane Courier. National Library of Australia. 18 November 1922. p. 17. Retrieved 23 October 2014.
  30. ^ Queensland Family History Society (2010), Queensland schools past and present (Version 1.01 ed.), Queensland Family History Society, ISBN 978-1-921171-26-0
  31. ^ Daryl Passmore (22 April 2012). "Shorncliffe Pier protest gains speed with pledge from Lord Mayor Graham Quirk". The Sunday Mail. News Queensland. Retrieved 4 June 2012.
  32. ^ Bill Johnston (21 March 2012). "Report to decide Shorncliffe pier's fate". Northside Chronicle. Quest Newspapers. Retrieved 4 June 2012.
  33. ^ "Shorncliffe Pier Renewal Project". Brisbane City Council. Retrieved 30 December 2014.
  34. ^ Johnston, Bill (5 April 2016). "Shorncliffe Pier opens with glaring spelling error". Quest Community Newspapers. Retrieved 9 April 2016.
  35. ^ "Musgrave House (entry 601499)". Queensland Heritage Register. Queensland Heritage Council. Retrieved 6 July 2013.
  36. ^ "Musgrave House". Brisbane Heritage Register. Brisbane City Council. Retrieved 20 July 2020.
  37. ^ "Caversham". Brisbane Heritage Register. Brisbane City Council. Retrieved 20 July 2020.
  38. ^ "17 Friday Street, Shorncliffe". Brisbane Heritage Register. Brisbane City Council. Retrieved 20 July 2020.
  39. ^ "Shorncliffe State School". Brisbane Heritage Register. Brisbane City Council. Retrieved 20 July 2020.
  40. ^ "Baxter's Oyster Saloon (former)". Brisbane Heritage Register. Brisbane City Council. Retrieved 20 July 2020.
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  42. ^ "Shorncliffe Lodge". Brisbane Heritage Register. Brisbane City Council. Retrieved 20 July 2020.
  43. ^ "22 Park Parade, Shorncliffe". Brisbane Heritage Register. Brisbane City Council. Retrieved 20 July 2020.
  44. ^ "Haddington". Brisbane Heritage Register. Brisbane City Council. Retrieved 20 July 2020.
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  46. ^ "Moora Park". Brisbane Heritage Register. Brisbane City Council. Retrieved 20 July 2020.
  47. ^ "Seaview Hotel". Brisbane Heritage Register. Brisbane City Council. Retrieved 20 July 2020.
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  55. ^ "Holland House". Brisbane Heritage Register. Brisbane City Council. Retrieved 20 July 2020.
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  58. ^ a b "ACARA School Profile 2018". Australian Curriculum, Assessment and Reporting Authority. Retrieved 28 January 2020.
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  60. ^ "Contact Us". Sandgate Golf Club. Archived from the original on 23 October 2014. Retrieved 23 October 2014.
  61. ^ "Branch Locations". Queensland Country Women's Association. Archived from the original on 26 December 2018. Retrieved 26 December 2018.

External links