Red Hill is an inner northern suburb in the City of Brisbane, Queensland, Australia.[3] In the 2016 census, Red Hill had a population of 5,560 people.[1]

Geography

Red Hill is 3.2 kilometres (2.0 mi) by road north-west of the Brisbane CBD. The suburb is very hilly and mainly residential, with shops and small businesses located on Musgrave and Waterworks Roads.[4]

History

A view of Red Hill from College Road

The suburb is one of the oldest in Brisbane. Red Hill got its name as a description from the steep hills which had lots of red soil and rocks.[3][5][6]

Circa 1880, 11 subdivided allotments of "Bristol Estate" were auctioned by J. Barger & Co. A map advertising the auction shows that the Estate is on Main Waterworks Road.[7]

St Brigid's Catholic School opened on 15 January 1881 and closed on 31 October 1989.[8]

In September 1883, 35 subdivided allotments were auctioned by E. Hooker & Son. A map advertising the auction shows that the allotments are in-between Oval Road and Waterworks Road.[9]

In November 1888, 67 subdivided allotments of "Lilley's Hill" were auctioned by W. J. Hooker. A map advertising the auction shows that the site has frontages to: Main Waterworks Road, Clifton Street, Clifton Terrace, Windsor Road, Oval (Victoria Street) Road, Prospect Terrace and Charles Street.[10][11]

From 1887 Red Hill was part of Shire of Ithaca,[12] which subsequently became the Town of Ithaca in 1903.[13] The Ithaca Town Council was absorbed into the Brisbane City Council in 1925.[13] The council chambers of the former Town Council were located in Enoggera Terrace and after amalgamation were used by the Brisbane City Council as a public library. The library closed in 1998.

A landmark of the suburb is St Bridget's Church, Red Hill, a Roman Catholic church, which was built in 1914. Its hilltop position and grand structure ensures that it is visible from all directions.[14]

Musgrave Road was the largest and main shopping strip before 1918, with a picture theatre, motor garage, grocers, fruiter, drapers and furniture shops.[6]

Ithaca Bowling Club was founded in February 1930 to cater for the western suburbs.[15] In May 1930 they leased space in Gilbert Park in Fulcher Street to create their bowling green.[16] The clubhouse was officially opened on 9 May 1931 by Brisbane Lord Mayor Archibald Watson.[17] Due to falling membership numbers, the club went into voluntary receivership in June 2011. The Red Hill Community Sports Club was then formed through merging Normanby Rugby League Club, Normanby Social Bowls Club and the Ashgrove RSL to take over the site and continue to run it for social bowls and other community purposes.[18]

Red Hill Special School opened on 28 January 1986.[8]

Abandoned roller skates and graffitti at the burned-out Skate Arena, 2014

Red Hill Picture Pops Theatre opened on Saturday 14 December 1912 on the northern corner of Enoggera Terrace and Musgrave Road (27°27′09″S 153°00′15″E / 27.4526°S 153.0041°E / -27.4526; 153.0041 (Red Hill Picture Pops (1912-1920))). It was an open air cinema. On 16 October 1920 the open-air cinema was replaced with a new brick enclosed cinema on the southern corner of Enoggera Terrace and Musgrave Road (27°27′10″S 153°00′15″E / 27.4529°S 153.0043°E / -27.4529; 153.0043 (Skate Arena)). It was 172 by 66 feet (52 by 20 m) and could seat 1,400 people. It cost £7,000. The opening night was dedicated to raise funds for the Ithaca War Memorial.[19] In April 1934 it became the State Theatre.[20] It functioned as a cinema until 1964, when it was converted into music venue called Teen City. In 1965 it was converted into a roller skating rink called Skate Arena. It was destroyed by arson on 26 December 2002. It was derelict for many years.[21][22] Brothers Peter and Stephen Sourris spent 2 years redeveloping the building and re-opened it as a 5-screen complex, called the Red Hill Cinemas, on Saturday 30 November 1919.[23][24] Their uncle and aunt, Christopher James and Effie Sourris had briefly owned the cinema in 1954.[25]

In the 2011 census the population of Red Hill was 5,016.[26]

In the 2016 census, Red Hill had a population of 5,560 people.[1]

Heritage listings

Former Ithaca Town Council Chambers, 2009
Normanby Hotel, 2008
St Brigid's Catholic Church, 2009

Red Hill has a number of heritage-listed sites, including:

Education

Red Hill Special School is a special education primary and secondary (Early Childhood-12) school for boys and girls at 72 Waterworks Road (27°27′03″S 153°00′02″E / 27.4507°S 153.0006°E / -27.4507; 153.0006 (Red Hill Special School)).[34][35] In 2017, the school had an enrolment of 64 students with 31 teachers (26 full-time equivalent) and 44 non-teaching staff (25 full-time equivalent).[36] a secondary (7-12) campus at 5 Fulcher Rd (27°26′56″S 152°59′42″E / 27.4490°S 152.9951°E / -27.4490; 152.9951 (Red Hill Special School - Ithaca Campus)).[34]

There are no other schools in Red Hill. The nearest general primary schools are Kelvin Grove State College in Kelvin Grove to the east, Petrie Terrace State School in Paddington to the south, and Ithaca Creek State School in Bardon to the west. The nearest general secondary school is Kelvin Grove State College.[4]

Transport

Bus – Red Hill is serviced by multiple council buses: the 380, 381 and 379 running along and Musgrave Roads, the 378 running along Arthur Terrace, and the 377 running along Kennedy Terrace.

Until August 1968, electric trams ran along Waterwords Road, Musgrave Road and Enoggera Terrace.[37]

Sport

The suburb is also the home of Brisbane's National Rugby League team, the Brisbane Broncos. Gilbert Park in Fulcher Road is the location of the Bronco's training ground, Leagues Club and general club management (27°26′54″S 152°59′46″E / 27.4483°S 152.9962°E / -27.4483; 152.9962 (Brisbane Broncos Club)).[38]

Red Hill Community Sports Club in Gilbert Park (27°26′50″S 152°59′48″E / 27.4472°S 152.9967°E / -27.4472; 152.9967 (Red Hill Community Sports Club)) is located adjacent to the Bronco's training ground.[39]

In popular culture

Nick Earls' novel Zigzag Street is set in the Red Hill street of the same name (27°27′16″S 153°00′22″E / 27.4545°S 153.0062°E / -27.4545; 153.0062 (Zig Zag Street)).[40]

Demographics

In the 2011 census the population of Red Hill was 5,016, 48.6% female and 51.4% male.[26] The median age of the Red Hill population was 43 years, 6 years above the Australian median.

89.1% of people living in Red Hill were born in Australia, compared to the national average of 69.8%; the next most common countries of birth were England 1.2%, South Africa 1.2%, Zambia 1.2%, Czech Republic 1.2%.

93.7% of people spoke only English at home; the next most common languages were Italian 2.4%, Greek 2.0%, Mandarin 1.5%, French 1.2% and Cantonese 1.0%.

References

  1. ^ a b c Australian Bureau of Statistics (27 June 2017). "Red Hill (SSC)". 2016 Census QuickStats. Retrieved 20 October 2018. Edit this at Wikidata
  2. ^ "Paddington Ward". Brisbane City Council. Brisbane City Council. Archived from the original on 12 March 2017. Retrieved 12 March 2017.
  3. ^ a b "Red Hill - suburb in City of Brisbane (entry 49674)". Queensland Place Names. Queensland Government. Retrieved 26 January 2020.
  4. ^ a b "Queensland Globe". State of Queensland. Retrieved 21 April 2020.
  5. ^ "Local History - Red Hill". www.abc.net.au. 25 August 2006. Archived from the original on 9 July 2016. Retrieved 10 August 2018.
  6. ^ a b "Red Hill | Queensland Places". www.queenslandplaces.com.au. Archived from the original on 11 August 2018. Retrieved 10 August 2018.
  7. ^ "Plan of the Bristol Estate, parish of Enoggera". 30 April 2019. hdl:10462/deriv/280179. Cite journal requires |journal= (help)
  8. ^ a b Queensland Family History Society (2010), Queensland schools past and present (Version 1.01 ed.), Queensland Family History Society, ISBN 978-1-921171-26-0
  9. ^ "Plan of Subdivisions of Portions 576, 577, 578, 598, 599, 600, situated on Red Hill, Waterworks Road, Parish of Enoggera". 8 September 1883. hdl:10462/deriv/436441. Cite journal requires |journal= (help)
  10. ^ "Plan of Lilley's Hill Estate". 17 November 1888. hdl:10462/deriv/259661. Cite journal requires |journal= (help)
  11. ^ "Advertising". The Telegraph (5, 023). Queensland, Australia. 15 November 1888. p. 8. Retrieved 30 April 2019 – via National Library of Australia.
  12. ^ "Agency ID9741, Ithaca Shire Council". Queensland State Archives. Retrieved 17 September 2013.
  13. ^ a b "Agency ID9635, Ithaca Town Council". Queensland State Archives. Retrieved 17 September 2013.
  14. ^ "Red Hill". OurBrisbane.com. Archived from the original on 7 June 2011. Retrieved 14 August 2018.
  15. ^ "BOWLS". The Brisbane Courier. Queensland, Australia. 1 February 1930. p. 10. Retrieved 21 April 2020 – via Trove.
  16. ^ "GREEN AT GILBERT PARK". The Brisbane Courier. Queensland, Australia. 13 May 1930. p. 8. Retrieved 21 April 2020 – via Trove.
  17. ^ "OPENING OF NEW BOWLING CLUB AT ITHACA". The Brisbane Courier. Queensland, Australia. 11 May 1931. p. 7. Retrieved 21 April 2020 – via Trove.
  18. ^ "History". Red Hill Community Sports Club. 19 July 2016. Archived from the original on 21 April 2020. Retrieved 21 April 2020.
  19. ^ "ITHACA WAR MEMORIAL". The Telegraph. Queensland, Australia. 16 October 1920. p. 8. Retrieved 21 April 2020 – via Trove.
  20. ^ "ENTERTAINMENTS". The Telegraph. Queensland, Australia. 13 April 1934. p. 12 (CITY FINAL LAST MINUTE NEWS). Retrieved 21 April 2020 – via Trove.
  21. ^ "Red Hill Skate Arena". www.weekendnotes.com. Archived from the original on 4 July 2018. Retrieved 18 February 2020.
  22. ^ "Destroyed by fire and abandoned since 2002, the Red Hill Skate Arena remains as a burnt-out, ruined shell". The Vintage News. 4 August 2016. Archived from the original on 21 April 2020. Retrieved 21 April 2020.
  23. ^ Garcia, Jocelyn (28 November 2019). "After 17 years, derelict skate arena to reopen as boutique cinemas". Brisbane Times. Archived from the original on 21 April 2020. Retrieved 21 April 2020.
  24. ^ "The Iconic Red Hill Skate Rink Is Getting A Huge $10 Million Redevelopment!". Style Magazines. 3 April 2019. Archived from the original on 21 April 2020. Retrieved 21 April 2020.
  25. ^ a b "Skate Arena (former)". Brisbane Heritage Register. Brisbane City Council. Retrieved 21 April 2020.
  26. ^ a b Australian Bureau of Statistics (31 October 2012). "Red Hill (State Suburb)". 2011 Census QuickStats. Retrieved 10 December 2015. Edit this at Wikidata
  27. ^ "Cross Terrace (entry 600285)". Queensland Heritage Register. Queensland Heritage Council. Retrieved 6 July 2013.
  28. ^ "Ithaca Town Council Chambers and Red Hill Kindergarten (former) (entry 602058)". Queensland Heritage Register. Queensland Heritage Council. Retrieved 6 July 2013.
  29. ^ "Normanby Hotel (entry 600283)". Queensland Heritage Register. Queensland Heritage Council. Retrieved 6 July 2013.
  30. ^ "Warriston (entry 600276)". Queensland Heritage Register. Queensland Heritage Council. Retrieved 6 July 2013.
  31. ^ "St Brigids Church (entry 600284)". Queensland Heritage Register. Queensland Heritage Council. Retrieved 6 July 2013.
  32. ^ "St Brigid's Convent (entry 601078)". Queensland Heritage Register. Queensland Heritage Council. Retrieved 6 July 2013.
  33. ^ "Craigerne (entry 600286)". Queensland Heritage Register. Queensland Heritage Council. Retrieved 6 July 2013.
  34. ^ a b "State and non-state school details". Queensland Government. 9 July 2018. Archived from the original on 21 November 2018. Retrieved 21 November 2018.
  35. ^ "Red Hill Special School". Archived from the original on 6 July 2011. Retrieved 21 November 2018.
  36. ^ "ACARA School Profile 2017". Archived from the original on 22 November 2018. Retrieved 22 November 2018.
  37. ^ Morris, Moorhouse. "THE LAST TRAM FROM ASHGROVE, and Other Historical Information". Ashgrove Historical Society Inc. Retrieved 26 January 2017.
  38. ^ "Home". Broncos Club. Archived from the original on 25 March 2020. Retrieved 21 April 2020.
  39. ^ "Red Hill Community Sports Club". Red Hill Community Sports Club. Archived from the original on 1 March 2020. Retrieved 21 April 2020.
  40. ^ Earls, Nick (1996), Zigzag street, Anchor, ISBN 978-0-330-35533-9

External links