Gordon Park, Queensland

Gordon Park is a quiet residential area in the middle of Brisbane's northern suburbs and the smallest suburb within Brisbane City Council. Gordon Park is located approximately 5 kilometres from the CBD and is bordered by Kedron Brook to the north and its bike-paths, walking tracks, and cafés throughout. Gordon Park’s unique position within Brisbane’s inner northern belt provides immediate access to major infrastructure such as the Airport Link M7 and the Northern Busway.

Geography

Gordon Park is about 5 kilometres (3.1 mi) from Brisbane's CBD. Over 37% of households in this area consist of couples with children, 40% are couples without children and 18% are single parent families. Stand alone housing accounts for 65% of all dwellings in this area, and units account for a further 28%. Highset Queenslanders, many beautifully renovated, are a feature of this green and leafy suburb. In June 2018 the median prices for a house and an apartment in Gordon Park were $889,100 (12% higher than last year) and $355,200 respectively.[4]

Gordon Park shares an Australia Post postcode of 4031 with neighbouring suburb Kedron.

History

Aboriginal history

The Turrbal clan occupied the northern side of the Brisbane River. This clan was often referred to by the "whites" as the "Duke of York's" clan. There were camping grounds around the Breakfast Creek area and the explorers John Oxley and Allan Cunningham met members of the clan at the mouth of the Creek in 1824.

The main encampment of the Turrbal clan was in "Yorks Hollow". This gully passes through Victoria Park and the Royal National Association Showgrounds at Bowen Hills. In 1858 two Aborigines, Dalinkua and Dalpie from the Breakfast Creek area, wrote letters to The Moreton Bay Courier protesting about the treatment their people received at the hands of the white settlers.

Urban development

The suburb was named after General Gordon who was the hero of the eight-month siege of Khartoum in the Sudan in the late 19th century. Most of the street names in the suburb relate to General Gordon, the armies he served with, and their sphere of operation (for example, Gordon Street, Khartoum Street, and Baker Street).

The Gordon Estate – Lutwyche of 264 blocks went to auction on 25 September 1886.

The Metropolitan Freehold Land and Building Company Limited advertised Gordon Park Estate for auction on 13 December 1890. It consisted of 1063 allotments (mostly of 16 to 20 perches). This estate was bounded by Staff Road to the north, Gordon Street to the east, Kedron Brook to the south and Burnaby Street (now Burnaby Terrace) to the west, encompassing almost all of the present day suburb except for the south-western corner.[5][6] However, the auctioneer G.T. Bell only sold 73 lots for an average price of £26 3s 7d (total £1,2917 10s).[7]

On 27 March 1920, auctioneers Cameron Brothers offered 61 allotments in the south-west of the current suburb in the area of Granville Terrace (now Bedford Street), Aberdeen Terrace and Thistle Street (these did not form part of the 1890 subdivision).[8][9] In June 1920, the auctioners offered further blocks to the south of the March 1920 sales, in the area of Granville Terrace (now Bedford Street), Stirling Street and Montrose Street.[10][11]

On 18 September 1920, auctioners Isles, Love & Co offered 150 allotments in the Glenkedron South Estate Section 2 (in the north-east of the current suburb). The allotments were in First Avenue (now Suez Street), Second Avenue (now Swan Street), Third Avenue (now Goulburn Street), Fourth Avenue (now Jack Street), Fifth Avenue (now Barron Street) and Seventh Avenue (now Rose Lane).[12][13]

On 6 May 1922, auctioneers Cameron Brothers offered 98 allotments for sale in the north-west of the current suburb in the area of Main Happy Valley Road (Stafford Road), Haig Street, Burnaby Street (now Burnaby Terrace), Turner Road (now Alva Terrace) and Victoria Terrace. These were part of the ninth second of the Gordon Park estate that had been first offered in 1890.[14][15]

On 11 November 1922, auctioneers Cameron Brothers offered 47 allotments in Section 1A of the Glen Park estate (as first offered in 1890). These allotments were in the area of Cowper Street, Hill Street (now Highland Street), Beaconsfield Terrace, Richmond Street and Khartoum Street.[16][17]

On 8 December 1923, auctioneers Cameron Brothers offered 45 home sites in the area of Granville Terrace (now Bedford Street), Aberdeen Terrace and Thistle Street.[18][19]

On 10 May 1924, auctioners Isles, Love & Co offered 24 remaining allotments in the Glenkedron South Estate in the north-east of the current suburb, which had been previously offered at auction in September 1920.[20][21] All 24 allotments were sold.[22]

In 1924, the Realty Development Company were selling suburban blocks (ranging from 16 to 20 perches) in the Tramway Extension Estate. This estate was bounded by Stafford Road to the north and Hill Street (now Highland Street) to the south and included Burnaby Street (now Burnaby Terrace), Turner Road (now Alva Terrace) and Victoria Terrace (and was part of the estate that was first offered in 1890 and again in 1922).[23][24]

In 1926 the Gordon Park Baptist Church started as a tent mission on property at Khartoum Street which was owned by the church. It was originally known as the Gordon Park Mission Church. The church rented a house, which became the home of the pastors on the corner of Groom and Thistle Streets until a manse was purchased and officially opened on 9 May 1953. The President of the Baptist Union of Queensland opened the Church hall in 1961. A new church at 106 Khartoum Street was built which opened on 10 September 1977. The original pulpit from the old church along with a communion tray was donated to the Beenleigh Baptist Church.

In November 1938, the Brisbane City Council announced that the tram to Gordon Park would be extended from Lutwyche Road via Bradshaw Street, crossing Kedrom Brook into Thistle Street.[25] Trams ran to Gordon Park connecting it with Brisbane until they were progressively withdrawn from use, finally ceasing all operations on 13 April 1969.

In the mid-1980s residents pushed to retain the locality name after concern that it could fade out of use.

Demographics

In the 2016 census, Gordon Park recorded a population of 4,231 people, 51.0% female and 49.0% male.

The median age of the Gordon Park population was 35 years of age, 3 years below the Australian median.

73.9% of people living in Gordon Park were born in Australia, compared to the national average of 66.7%; the next most common countries of birth were New Zealand 2.9%, England 2.5%, India 2.1%, Italy 1.0%, and China 0.8%.

82.8% of people spoke only English at home; the next most popular languages were 1.7% Italian, 1.0% Spanish, 1.0% Mandarin, 0.9% Hindi, and 0.7% Punjabi.

Notable residents

Gordon Park resident, Tom Nash, was born in Essex, England in 1909. He emigrated to Australia at the age of 17 aboard the S.S. Vedic, a ship chartered by the Salvation Army to bring 700 young emigrant to Australia. He was awarded the Order of Australia in 1985 in recognition of his service to the local community. Prior to receiving the award he had received a certificate of merit for services to the incapacitated Servicemen's Association, an RSL certificate of merit, honorary life membership of the RSL and the Paul Harris Fellowship medal from Rotary International. Tom Nash had also been a Brisbane City Council councillor.

References

  1. ^ Australian Bureau of Statistics (27 June 2017). "Gordon Park (State Suburb)". 2016 Census QuickStats. Retrieved 4 July 2017. Edit this at Wikidata
  2. ^ "Marchant Ward". Brisbane City Council. Brisbane City Council. Retrieved 12 March 2017.
  3. ^ "Google Maps". Retrieved 12 September 2017.
  4. ^ "ksouhouse.com". www.ksouhouse.com. Retrieved 6 July 2018.
  5. ^ "Gordon Park Lutwyche". State Library of Queensland. 1890. Retrieved 28 May 2019.
  6. ^ "Advertising". The Telegraph (5, 665). Queensland, Australia. 11 December 1890. p. 8 (SECOND EDITION). Retrieved 28 May 2019 – via National Library of Australia.
  7. ^ "Wool Sales". The Telegraph (5, 668). Queensland, Australia. 15 December 1890. p. 4 (SECOND EDITION). Retrieved 28 May 2019 – via National Library of Australia.
  8. ^ "Gordon Park: The Pride of Kedron". State Library of Queensland. 1920. Retrieved 28 May 2019.
  9. ^ "Advertising". Daily Standard (2260). Queensland, Australia. 27 March 1920. p. 8. Retrieved 28 May 2019 – via National Library of Australia.
  10. ^ "Gordon Park 7th Section". State Library of Queensland. 1920. Retrieved 28 May 2019.
  11. ^ "Advertising". The Brisbane Courier (19, 480). Queensland, Australia. 26 June 1920. p. 8. Retrieved 28 May 2019 – via National Library of Australia.
  12. ^ "Glenkedron Estate Section 2". State Library of Queensland. 1920. Retrieved 28 May 2019.
  13. ^ "Advertising". The Brisbane Courier (19, 552). Queensland, Australia. 18 September 1920. p. 8. Retrieved 28 May 2019 – via National Library of Australia.
  14. ^ "Gordon Park: The Pride of Kedron: Section 9". State Library of Queensland. 1922. Retrieved 28 May 2019.
  15. ^ "Advertising". The Telegraph (15, 425). Queensland, Australia. 6 May 1922. p. 16. Retrieved 28 May 2019 – via National Library of Australia.
  16. ^ "Gordon Park: The Pride of Kedron: Section 1A". State Library of Queensland. 1922. Retrieved 28 May 2019.
  17. ^ "Advertising". The Telegraph (15, 585). Queensland, Australia. 9 November 1922. p. 12 (SECOND EDITION). Retrieved 28 May 2019 – via National Library of Australia.
  18. ^ "Gordon Park". State Library of Queensland. 1923. Retrieved 28 May 2019.
  19. ^ "Advertising". The Daily Mail (6796). Queensland, Australia. 8 December 1923. p. 20. Retrieved 28 May 2019 – via National Library of Australia.
  20. ^ "Glenkedron South Estate". State Library of Queensland. 1924. Retrieved 28 May 2019.
  21. ^ "Advertising". The Brisbane Courier (20, 685). Queensland, Australia. 10 May 1924. p. 12. Retrieved 28 May 2019 – via National Library of Australia.
  22. ^ "REAL ESTATE". The Brisbane Courier (20, 687). Queensland, Australia. 13 May 1924. p. 3. Retrieved 28 May 2019 – via National Library of Australia.
  23. ^ "Gordon Park Tramway Extension Estate". State Library of Queensland. 1924. Retrieved 28 May 2019.
  24. ^ "Advertising". Truth (1, 257). Queensland, Australia. 13 April 1924. p. 18. Retrieved 28 May 2019 – via National Library of Australia.
  25. ^ "GORDON PARK TRAM EXTENSION". The Telegraph. Queensland, Australia. 22 November 1938. p. 15 (CITY FINAL LAST MINUTE NEWS). Retrieved 28 May 2019 – via National Library of Australia.

External links

Coordinates: 27°24′58″S 153°01′37″E / 27.416°S 153.027°E / -27.416; 153.027