Milang, South Australia

Milang (/məˈlæŋ/ m(ə)-LANG) is a town and locality located in the Australian state of South Australia on the west coast of Lake Alexandrina about 71 kilometres (44 mi) south-east of the state capital of Adelaide and about 20 kilometres (12 mi) north-east of the municipal seat of Goolwa.[1][5]

Milang is within the federal division of Mayo, the state electoral district of Hammond and the local government area of the Alexandrina Council.[8][1][7]

At the 2016 census, the northern part of the locality had a population of 883, of which 761 lived in its town centre. The southern part of Milang shared a population of 69 people with the locality of Point Sturt.[4][2][1][3]

The town was surveyed in December 1853;[9] it became a significant port on the River Murray system between 1860 and 1880.[10] Between December 1884 and June 1970, a branch line off the Mount Barker–Victor Harbor railway ran 13.1 km (8.1 mi) from a junction at Sandergrove to Milang, mainly for freight traffic but also as a minor passenger service. The line was dismantled after its closure in 1970.[11]

Milang played a historic role as host to the first South Australian Boy Scout camp in the summer of 1909–1910;[12] a bronze plaque marks the location.

Milang Football Club (the Milang Panthers) compete in the Hills Football League C Grade competition.[citation needed]

Heritage listings

Milang has many 19th century buildings and some heritage-listed sites including:

  • Coxe Street: [13]
  • 46-50 Coxe Street: [14]
  • 22-23 Daranda Terrace: [15]
  • Lake front: [16]
  • 5-7 Markland Street: Dwelling with pressed iron facade [17]

Tourist attractions

Milang tourist attractions include fishing from the state heritage-listed jetty, the Milang Historical Society museum, the Milang Historical Walk, and boating, swimming and jet skiing on the River Murray.

The Milang Historical Railway Museum, opened in 1992 and located in the station building of the now-closed Milang railway line, features many old photos and railway memorabilia from the era when Milang was a significant port for the River Murray shipping trade. It has become one of Milang's major attractions with its displays of the railway-era history of the town and surrounding districts, its locomotive and carriages and, in the locomotive, a computer operated driving simulator that visitors over the age of 10 can operate.[18][19]

Another railway-themed attraction is the South Australian Light Railway Centre, on the museum site,[20] which tells the story of about 700 light railways that once operated in the state in mines, forests, wineries, munitions factories and quarries, and at jetties to transport goods from ships. It includes three historic locomotives and two section cars, displays, rolling stock models, and a model light railway that visitors can drive.[21][19]

References

Notes
  1. ^ For the 2016 census, the State Suburb of Milang consisted of the locality of Milang north of Landseer Road. The portion of Milang south of Landseer Road was included in the State Suburb of Point Sturt along with the locality of Point Sturt[2][1][3]
Citations
  1. ^ a b c d e f g h "Search result for "Milang, LOCB" with the following datasets selected - "Suburbs and Localities", "Counties", "Government Towns", "Local Government Areas", "SA Government Regions" and "Gazetteer"". Location SA Map Viewer. South Australian government. Retrieved 17 September 2018.
  2. ^ a b c Australian Bureau of Statistics (27 June 2017). "Milang (state suburb)". 2016 Census QuickStats. Retrieved 17 September 2018. Edit this at Wikidata
  3. ^ a b Australian Bureau of Statistics (27 June 2017). "Point Sturt (state suburb)". 2016 Census QuickStats. Retrieved 17 September 2018. Edit this at Wikidata
  4. ^ a b Australian Bureau of Statistics (27 June 2017). "Milang (Urban Centres and Localities)". 2016 Census QuickStats. Retrieved 17 September 2018. Edit this at Wikidata
  5. ^ a b c "Postcode for Milang, South Australia". postcodes-australia.com. Retrieved 17 September 2018.
  6. ^ "Fleurieu Kangaroo Island SA Government region" (PDF). The Government of South Australia. Retrieved 17 April 2017.
  7. ^ a b Hammond (Map). Electoral District Boundaries Commission. 2016. Retrieved 17 September 2018.
  8. ^ a b "Federal electoral division of Mayo, boundary gazetted 16 December 2011" (PDF). Australian Electoral Commission. Retrieved 25 January 2018.
  9. ^ "Milang, South Australia". Place Names Online. Government of South Australia Department for Transport, Energy and Infrastructure. Retrieved 2 August 2008.[dead link]
  10. ^ "Milang: The Jetty". Archived from the original on 19 July 2008. Retrieved 2 August 2008.
  11. ^ Sallis, Roger (1998). Railways in the Adelaide Hills, 1st edition. Openbook Publishers, Adelaide. ISBN 0-646-35473-6.
  12. ^ {{cite news |url=https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/164688143# |title=Scouts under canvas |newspaper=Observer (Adelaide) |location=Adelaide, SA |date=1 January 1910 |accessdate=3 Jun 2019 |p=35 |publisher=publisher=National Library of Australia (Trove digital newspaper archive))
  13. ^ "Cannon that fired royal salute in 1867, Soldiers Memorial Park". South Australian Heritage Register. Department of Environment, Water and Natural Resources. Retrieved 11 September 2016.
  14. ^ "Milang School". South Australian Heritage Register. Department of Environment, Water and Natural Resources. Retrieved 11 September 2016.
  15. ^ "Former Milang Butter Factory". South Australian Heritage Register. Department of Environment, Water and Natural Resources. Retrieved 11 September 2016.
  16. ^ "Milang Jetty and Hand Crane". South Australian Heritage Register. Department of Environment, Water and Natural Resources. Retrieved 11 September 2016.
  17. ^ "Dwelling with pressed iron facade". South Australian Heritage Register. Department of Environment, Water and Natural Resources. Retrieved 11 September 2016.
  18. ^ Walsh, Dave (12 December 2016). "Port Milang Historic Railway Museum". Weekend notes. Oat Labs, Sydney. Retrieved 3 June 2019.
  19. ^ a b Walsh, Dave (14 December 2016). "South Australian Light Railway Centre opening". Weekend notes. Oat Labs, Sydney. Retrieved 3 June 2019.
  20. ^ http://milangrailway.org.au/milangwebsite_006.htm
  21. ^ "The new South Australian Light Railway Centre". The Port Milang Historic Railway Museum. Milang Historical Railway Museum Inc. 2019. Retrieved 3 June 2019.