Local government areas of New South Wales

Map of Local Government Areas in New South Wales
Types and titles of LGAs in New South Wales
LGA Regions in New South Wales
Local government areas in Sydney

The local government areas (LGA) of New South Wales in Australia describes the institutions and processes by which areas, cities, towns, municipalities, regions, shires, and districts can manage their own affairs to the extent permitted by the Local Government Act 1993 (NSW).

Local government authorities provide a wide range of services. The most important of these are the general services of administration, health, community amenities, recreation and culture, roads and debt servicing throughout the area controlled by the council. Councils also provide a range of trading activities, mainly in country areas of NSW. These trading activities include water supply, sewerage services, gas services and abattoir facilities.[1]

Administered by the Government of New South Wales and subject to periodic restructuring involving voluntary and involuntary amalgamation of areas, local government areas are considered a city when an area has received city status by proclamation of the Governor. Some areas retain designations they held under prior legislation, even though these titles no longer indicate a legal status. These include municipalities (that are predominantly inner-city suburban areas and smaller rural towns) and shires (that are predominantly rural or outer suburban areas). Many councils now choose not to use any area title, and simply refer to themselves as councils, e.g. Northern Beaches Council, Burwood Council. The smallest local government by area in the state is the Municipality of Hunter's Hill (5.7km2) and the largest by area is Central Darling Shire Council (53,492km2).

History

Legislation

The formation of local government in New South Wales predates the formation of responsible government in the state. The Sydney Corporation was formed in 1842, an elected body to manage primary services such as street lighting and drainage.[2] The Municipalities Act, 1858 introduced a system of local government. Municipalities were compulsorily incorporated by legislation in 1876, the third Municipalities Act, 1897 consolidated municipal law, and in 1905 the Local Government (Shires) Act 1905 was enacted to establish shires.[3] The Local Government Act, 1906 reformed the municipal system, replaced by the Local Government Act, 1919, which lasted until the most recent 1993 Act.

The core principles of the 1993 legislative reforms were:

  1. greater accountability by councils to their communities through better reporting, management plans, consultation on key issues, and access to information;
  2. changes to the relationship between councillors and staff, whereby the elected council held all powers given under the Act, but could delegate most powers and appoint General Managers to have responsibility for “day-to-day” management, council staff and financial resources; and
  3. a better distinction between service provision and regulatory activity was drawn. Maximum flexibility was given in respect to service provision, with some constraints, and accountability was increased. In regard to regulatory functions, proper attention had to be given to due process and procedural correctness.[3]

Reviews of local government areas

NSW LGAs over time
Year Number
of LGAs
Ref.
1906 327 [3]
1910 324
1991 176
1992 177
2001 173
2004 152
2016 132 [4]

The NSW Government has undertaken periodic reviews of local government since the early 1900s. Reforms included providing enfranchisement for women and for residents who did not own property in the LGA, standardising land valuation systems, and the introduction of ordinances.

1930s

The Greater Newcastle Act 1937 amalgamated 10 municipalities with the City of Newcastle to form Greater Newcastle.

1940s

In the post-war period, the Labor Party government of James McGirr, led by Joseph Cahill as Minister for Local Government, decided, following the recommendations of the 1945–46 Clancy Royal Commission on Local Government Boundaries, that Local Government reform would assist the process of improving state infrastructure and community facilities.[5] This vision for a local government reform agenda, including large-scale amalgamations, was largely implemented in the Sydney basin through the Local Government (Areas) Act 1948.

1970s

The Barnett Committee Review of Local Government Areas, conducted during 1973-74, sought to create stronger economic LGAs through a substantial reduction in council numbers. The Barnett Report recommended the forced merging of the then 223 existing local government entities into 97 districts; a proposal that was initially rejected by the Askin–led coalition government. However, by 1980 and after several references to the NSW Local Government Boundaries Commission, the Wran-led Labor government amalgamated 38 councils into 17 entities.[3]

The Bains Review of 1978 influenced the adoption of corporate management in councils whereby council affairs were dealt with as a whole and with co-ordinated forward planning, comprehensive distribution of resources and proper performance monitoring. Bains' review had major influence on the engagement of more powerful general managers, councillors becoming policy makers, and staff free from administrative councillor interference.[3]

1980s

Completed by the NSW Local Government Boundaries Commission, this review focused on the efficiencies in the mergers of rural and regional councils and the anticipated economies of scale in service provision. The Local Government Areas Amalgamation Act 1980 saw the amalgamation of many municipalities with the shires that neighboured - and in some instances, surrounded - them.

1990s

The Carr-led Labor government initiated the Local Government Reform Task Force of 1995-97, the principal outcome of which was to promote resource sharing through the various regional organisations of councils.[3] Triggered by a paper issued by the NSW Local Government and Shires Association, twenty-one councils reviewed their own position and explored three options including the status quo, models for resource sharing and a merger. However, only four councils entered into voluntary mergers in order to avoid potential forced amalgamations.[3]

2000s

The Sproats Inquiry into the structure of local government in eight council areas of the Inner City and Eastern Suburbs of Sydney was commissioned by the state government in October 2000. Despite recommendations for mergers, with the Carr government maintaining a no-forced amalgamation policy, no mergers transpired until late 2008 when Sproats was invited to review his earlier paper, including revisiting the controversial proposal to amalgamate the City of Sydney Council with the South Sydney City Council.[3]

The Carr government abandoned its policy of no forced mergers after the 2003 state election. Within a year, regional “super” councils were legislated for Inner Sydney, surrounding Canberra, Goulburn and Tamworth; four general purpose and two county councils were merged in Clarence Valley, as well as a number of other smaller-scale rural council amalgamations.[3]

2010s

In October 2013, the NSW Government released the findings of an independent review of local government in New South Wales. The review findings, entitled Revitalising Local Government, examined historical and projected demographic data, financial sustainability, and other measures and projected the long-term viability of all local government bodies in the state. Included in the report were 65 recommendations to the government.[6]

The government released its response to the review findings in September 2014 and then facilitated discussions with certain local government authorities with a view towards merger and/or amalgamation.[7] In April 2015, the NSW Government referred the review findings and its responses to the NSW Independent Pricing and Regulatory Tribunal (IPART) to act as the Expert Advisory Panel and to review local council Fit for the Future proposals.[8] Releasing its final report in October 2015, the IPART reviewed submissions from local government authorities and others with a view towards establishing authorities that have the scale and capacity to engage effectively across community, industry and government, are sustainable and efficient, and that effectively manage infrastructure and deliver services for local communities. The IPART found that:[9][10]

  • 71 per cent of councils in metropolitan Sydney were 'not fit', primarily because councils did not propose a merger despite clear benefits; and
  • 56 per cent of councils in regional NSW were 'not fit', due to not proposing a merger despite clear benefits, ongoing deficits or both.

The IPART proposed a series of council mergers and amalgamation in both metropolitan and regional areas which proposed a reduction in the number of councils from 152 to 112.[11] The NSW Government invited local government authorities to respond by 20 November 2015. Public response to the proposed amalgamations was mixed.[12] Following consideration of the submissions, the Minister for Local Government referred merger proposals to the Chief Executive of the Office of Local Government (OLG) for examination and report under the Local Government Act. The OLG Chief Executive delegated the examination and reporting functions to Delegates who conducted public inquiries and invited further written submissions by 28 February 2016.[13] On 12 May 2016, following a further review by the Minister for Local Government and the independent Local Government Boundaries Commission, Premier Mike Baird announced the creation of 19 new councils, through amalgamations and mergers, with immediate effect. The Minister indicated in principle support to create a further nine new councils, subject to the decision of the courts.[14][15] On the same day, the Governor of New South Wales acted on the advice of the Minister, and proclaimed the 19 new local government areas.[16]

On 9 May 2016, Strathfield Council challenged the proposed merger between Strathfield, Burwood and Canada Bay councils and commenced proceedings in the New South Wales Land and Environment Court. After the Court heard that there were legal flaws in the report from the State Government-appointed delegate who examined the proposal for merging the councils, on 31 May, the NSW Government withdrew from the case and the merger proposal stalled. Mosman, Hunters Hill, North Sydney, Ku-ring-gai, Woollahra, Oberon and Walcha councils also challenged the Government's amalgamations.[17][18] The proclamation of the new Bayside Council occurred on 9 September 2016, following the conclusion of legal action by in the Court of Appeal.[19] In December, the NSW Court of Appeal unanimously dismissed Woollahra Council's appeal, finding no merit in its arguments that the proposed merger with its neighbouring councils was invalid.[20] In July 2017, the Berejiklian government decided to abandon the forced merger of the Sydney local government areas, following an earlier move to abandon proposed forced mergers in rural and regional NSW.[21]

List of all local government areas in New South Wales

As of 9 September 2016 there were 128 local government areas in New South Wales,[4] listed below in alphabetical order by region. There is also the Unincorporated Far West Region which is not part of any local government area, in the sparsely inhabited Far West, and Lord Howe Island, which is also unincorporated but self-governed by the Lord Howe Island Board.

Greater metropolitan Sydney

Local government area Date established Area[22] Population[22] Map
Borough / District / Municipality / Shire City km2 sq mi Rank 2018 Rank
Bayside Council 13 January 1871 (1871-01-13) (as Rockdale municipality) 9 September 2016 (2016-09-09)[23] 50 19 113 174,378 15 Bayside LGA in Metropolitan Sydney.png
Blacktown, City of 6 March 1906 (Shire)[24] 7 March 1979 (1979-03-07) 240 93 103 366,534 2 Blacktown LGA in Metropolitan Sydney.png
Burwood, Municipality of 27 March 1874[25] n/a 7.1 2.7 127 39,886 54 Burwood LGA in Metropolitan Sydney.png
Camden Council 6 February 1889[26] n/a 201 78 104 94,159 27 Camden LGA in Metropolitan Sydney.png
Campbelltown, City of 21 January 1882[27] 4 May 1968 (1968-05-04) 312 120 97 168,139 17 Campbelltown LGA in Metropolitan Sydney.png
Canada Bay, City of 11 August 1883 (Municipal District of Concord)[28]
18 January 1890 (Borough of Drummoyne)
December 2000 (2000-12) 20 7.7 120 95,159 26 Canada Bay LGA in Metropolitan Sydney.png
Canterbury-Bankstown, City of 17 March 1879 (1879-03-17) (Municipal District of Canterbury)
7 September 1895 (1895-09-07) (Municipal District of Bankstown)
12 May 2016 (2016-05-12)[29] 110 42 108 373,931 1 Canterbury Bankstown LGA in Metropolitan Sydney.png
Cumberland Council 9 July 1872 (1872-07-09)
(as the Prospect and Sherwood Municipal District)
12 May 2016 (2016-05-12)[30] 72 28 112 236,893 7 Cumberland LGA in Metropolitan Sydney.png
Fairfield, City of 11 December 1888 (1888-12-11)
(as the Smithfield and Fairfield Municipal District)
18 May 1979 (1979-05-18) 102 39 109 210,612 11 Fairfield LGA in Metropolitan Sydney.png
Georges River Council 22 December 1885 (1885-12-22)
(as the Kogarah municipality)
12 May 2016 (2016-05-12)[31] 38 15 115 158,411 19 Georges River LGA in Metropolitan Sydney.png
Hornsby Shire 6 March 1906 (1906-03-06)[24] n/a 455 176 92 150,752 21 Hornsby LGA in Metropolitan Sydney.png
Hunter's Hill, Municipality of 7 January 1861[32] n/a 5.7 2.2 128 14,909 76 Hunters Hill LGA in Metropolitan Sydney.png
Inner West Council 1 November 1861 (1861-11-01) (Municipality of Marrickville)
28 December 1871 (1871-12-28) (Borough of Ashfield)
29 December 1871 (1871-12-29) (Municipal District of Leichhardt)
12 May 2016 (2016-05-12)[33] 35 14 117 198,024 14 Inner West LGA in Metropolitan Sydney.png
Ku-ring-gai Council 1906 (shire),[24] 1928 (municipality) n/a 85 33 110 126,046 23 Ku-ring-gai LGA.png
Lane Cove Council 11 February 1895 (Borough of Lane Cove)[34] n/a 11 4.2 123 39,486 59 Lane Cove LGA in Metropolitan Sydney.png
Liverpool, City of 27 June 1872 (1872-06-27) (municipal district) 9 November 1960 (1960-11-09) 306 118 99 223,304 9 Liverpool LGA in Metropolitan Sydney.png
Mosman Council 11 April 1893
(as Borough of Mosman)[35]
n/a 8.7 3.4 126 30,877 59 Mosman LGA in Metropolitan Sydney.png
North Sydney Council 31 July 1890 (as Borough of North Sydney)[36] n/a 11 4.2 123 74,172 34 North Sydney LGA in Metropolitan Sydney.png
Northern Beaches Council 6 January 1877 (1877-01-06) (Manly Municipality)
7 March 1906 (1906-03-07) (as Warringah Shire)[24]
1 May 1992 (1992-05-01) (as Pittwater Municipality)
12 May 2016 (2016-05-12)[37] 254 98 102 271,278 4 Northern Beaches LGA in Metropolitan Sydney.png
Parramatta, City of 27 November 1861 (1861-11-27) (municipality) 27 October 1938 (1938-10-27)
12 May 2016 (2016-05-12)[38]
84 32 111 251,311 5 Parramatta LGA in Metropolitan Sydney.png
Penrith, City of 12 May 1871 (1871-05-12) (municipality)[39] 21 October 1959 (1959-10-21) 405 156 93 209,210 12 Penrith LGA in Metropolitan Sydney.png
Randwick, City of 23 February 1859[40] 36 14 116 154,265 20 Randwick LGA in Metropolitan Sydney.png
Ryde, City of 12 November 1870 (1870-11-12) (municipal district) 1 January 1992 (1992-01-01) 41 16 114 127,446 22 Ryde LGA in Metropolitan Sydney.png
Strathfield, Municipality of 2 June 1885 (1885-06-02) n/a 14 5.4 121 45,143 49 Strathfield LGA in Metropolitan Sydney.png
Sutherland Shire 6 March 1906 (1906-03-06)[24] n/a 334 129 96 229,213 8 Sutherland LGA in Metropolitan Sydney.png
Sydney, City of 20 July 1842 (1842-07-20)[41] 27 10 118 240,229 6 Sydney LGA in Metropolitan Sydney.png
The Hills Shire 6 March 1906 (1906-03-06)[24]
(as Baulkham Hills Shire)
n/a 386 149 95 172,473 16 The Hills LGA in Metropolitan Sydney.png
Waverley, Municipality of 16 June 1859 (1859-06-16)[42] n/a 9.4 3.6 125 74,114 35 Waverley LGA in Metropolitan Sydney.png
Willoughby, City of 23 October 1865[43] 17 November 1989[44] 22 8.5 119 80,339 31 Willoughby LGA in Metropolitan Sydney.png
Woollahra, Municipality of 20 April 1860 (1860-04-20)[45] n/a 12 4.6 122 58,964 43 Woollahra LGA in Metropolitan Sydney.png

Sydney surrounds

Local government area Date established Area[22] Population[22] Map
Borough / District / Municipality City km2 mi2 Rank (2018) Rank
Blue Mountains, City of 4 January 1889 (1889-01-04)
(as the Municipality of Katoomba)[46]
1 October 1947 (1947-10-01) 1,431 553 82 79,260 32 Blue Mountains LGA within NSW.png
Central Coast Council 11 November 1886
(as Borough of Gosford)[47]
12 May 2016 (2016-05-12)[48] 1,681 649 78 342,047 3 Central Coast LGA in NSW.png
Hawkesbury, City of 1843
(as Windsor District Council)
1989[49] 2,775 1,071 69 67,083 38 Hawkesbury LGA in NSW.png
Wollondilly Shire 6 March 1906[24] n/a 2,555 986 71 52,230 46 Wollondilly LGA in NSW.png

Rural and regional areas

Mid North Coast

Local government area Date established Area[22] Population[22] Map
Shire / Municipality City km2 mi2 Rank (2018) Rank
Bellingen Shire 30 November 1956[50] 1,600 620 79 12,963 83 Bellingen LGA within NSW.png
Clarence Valley Council 25 February 2004[51] 10,429 4,027 scope="row"|18 51,647 47 Clarence LGA within NSW.png
Coffs Harbour, City of 30 November 1956 (Shire) 1 May 1987[50][52] 1,174 453 85 76,551 33 Coffs Harbour LGA within NSW.png
Kempsey Shire 11 June 1886 (Borough)[53] 3,376 1,303 62 29,665 62 Kempsey LGA within NSW.png
Nambucca Valley Council 15 December 1915[54] 1,491 576 81 19,773 70 Nambucca LGA within NSW.png
Port Macquarie-Hastings Council 15 March 1887 (municipal) (1887 (municipal)-03-15)[55] 3,682 1,422 56 83,131 30 Port Macquarie Hastings LGA within NSW.png
Lord Howe Island 1913 (Board of Control), 1954 (Board)[56] 15 5.8 382[57]

Murray

Local government area Date established Area[22] Population[22] Map
Municipality / Shire City km2 mi2 Rank (2018) Rank
Albury, City of 4 June 1859
(as Municipality)[58]
1946[59] 306 118 98 53,767 44 Albury LGA in NSW.png
Balranald Shire 27 September 1882[60] n/a 21,691 8,375 6 2,340 126 Balranald LGA in NSW.png
Berrigan Shire 6 March 1906[24] n/a 2,066 798 74 8,707 97 Berrigan LGA in NSW.png
Edward River Council 12 May 2016 (2016-05-12)[61] n/a 8,884 3,430 24 8,995 94 Edward River LGA in NSW.png
Federation Council 12 May 2016 (2016-05-12)[62] n/a 5,685 2,195 40 12,462 86 Federation LGA in NSW.png
Greater Hume Shire 26 May 2004[63] n/a 5,750 2,220 39 10,686 90 Greater Hume LGA in NSW.png
Murray River Council 12 May 2016 (2016-05-12)[64] n/a 11,864 4,581 15 12,118 87 Murray River LGA in NSW.png
Wentworth Shire 23 January 1879 (1879-01-23) (municipality),[65]
xxxx (shire)
n/a 26,256 10,137 4 7,042 101 Wentworth LGA in NSW.png

The Riverina

Local government area Date established Area[22] Population[22] Map
Municipality / Shire City km2 mi2 Rank (2018) Rank
Bland Shire 6 March 1906[24] n/a 8,558 3,304 28 5,985 109 Bland LGA in NSW.png
Carrathool Shire 27 October 1943[66] n/a 18,935 7,311 8 2,802 122 Carrathool LGA in NSW.png
Coolamon Shire 6 March 1906[24] n/a 2,431 939 73 4,368 114 Coolamon LGA in NSW.png
Cootamundra-Gundagai Regional Council 12 May 2016 (2016-05-12)[67] n/a 3,981 1,537 54 11,260 89 Cootamundra Gundagai LGA in NSW.png
Griffith, City of 6 January 1928 (1928-01-06) 1 January 1982 (1982-01-01) 1,639 633 78 26,882 63 Griffith LGA in NSW.png
Hay Shire 1 January 1965[68]

10 June 1872 (as Municipality)

n/a 11,326 4,373 16 2,979 121 Hay LGA in NSW.png
Junee Shire 26 July 1886 (Borough)[69] n/a 2,030 780 75 6,631 103 Junee LGA in NSW.png
Leeton Shire 20 December 1927

(Willimbong Shire)[70]

n/a 1,167 451 86 11,438 88 Leeton LGA in NSW.png
Lockhart Shire 6 March 1906[24] n/a 2,896 1,118 66 3,295 119 Lockhart LGA in NSW.png
Murrumbidgee Council 12 May 2016 (2016-05-12)[71] n/a 6,881 2,657 34 3,961 117 Murrumbidgee LGA in NSW.png
Narrandera Shire 1 January 1960 (1960-01-01) n/a 4,116 1,589 52 5,931 110 Narrandera LGA in NSW.png
Snowy Valleys Council 12 May 2016 (2016-05-12)[72] n/a 8,959 3,459 23 14,532 78 Snowy Valleys LGA in NSW.png
Temora Shire 1 January 1981 n/a 2,802 1,082 68 6,274 105 Temora LGA in NSW.png
Wagga Wagga, City of 15 March 1870 (Borough)[73] 1 January 1981 (1981-01-01) 4,825 1,863 48 64,820 39 Wagga Wagga LGA in NSW.png

Greater Metropolitan Newcastle[74] and Hunter

Local government area Date established Area[22] Population[22] Map
Municipality / Shire City km2 mi2 Rank (2018) Rank
Cessnock, City of 7 March 1906 (shire)[75] n/a 1,965 759 76 59,101 42 Cessnock LGA in NSW.png
Dungog Shire 16 May 1893[76] n/a 2,250 870 73 9,346 93 Dungog LGA in NSW.png
Lake Macquarie, City of 1906 (Shire); 1977 (municipality) 7 September 1984 (1984-09-07) 649 251 89 204,914 13 Lake Macquarie LGA in NSW.png
Maitland, City of 12 March 1862
(as Municipality of East Maitland)
7 December 1945[77] 392 151 94 83,203 29 Maitland LGA in NSW.png
Mid-Coast Council 12 May 2016 (2016-05-12)[78] n/a 10,054 3,882 19 93,288 28 Midcoast LGA in NSW.png
Muswellbrook Shire 13 April 1870
(Municipal District of Musclebrook)[79]
n/a 3,405 1,315 61 16,383 75 Muswellbrook LGA in NSW.png
Newcastle, City of 8 June 1859 (Municipality)[80] 26 January 1848[81] 187 72 105 164,104 18 Newcastle LGA in NSW.png
Port Stephens Council 7 March 1906 (Shire)[24] n/a 858 331 87 72,695 36 Port Stephens LGA in NSW.png
Singleton Council 2 February 1866 (Municipality)[82] n/a 4,893 1,889 46 23,422 65 Singleton LGA in NSW.png
Upper Hunter Shire 26 May 2004 (2004-05-26)[63] n/a 8,096 3,126 29 14,220 79 Upper Hunter LGA in NSW.png

Illawarra

Local government area Date established Area[22] Population[22] Map
Municipality / Shire City km2 mi2 Rank (2018) Rank
Kiama, Municipality of 1859 (municipality) n/a 258 100 101 23,006 67 Kiama LGA in NSW.png
Shellharbour, City of 4 June 1859 (1859-06-04) (municipality) May 1996 147 57 107 72,240 37 Shellharbour LGA in NSW.png
Shoalhaven, City of 1 July 1948 (1948-07-01) (shire) 13 July 1979 (1979-07-13)[83] 4,567 1,763 50 104,371 24 Shoalhaven LGA in NSW.png
Wingecarribee Shire 1 January 1981 (1981-01-01) n/a 2,689 1,038 70 50,493 48 Wingecarribee LGA in NSW.png
Wollongong, City of 24 August 1843 (1843-08-24)
(as Illawarra District Council)
11 September 1942 (1942-09-11) 684 264 88 216,071 10 Wollongong LGA in NSW.png

Richmond-Tweed

Local government area Date established Area[22] Population[22] Map
Municipality / Shire City km2 mi2 Rank (2018) Rank
Ballina Shire 1976 (1976) n/a 485 187 91 44,208 50 Ballina LGA within NSW.png
Byron Shire 6 March 1906 (1906-03-06)[24] n/a 566 219 90 34,574 57 Byron LGA within NSW.png
Kyogle Council 6 March 1906
(Shire)[24]
n/a 3,584 1,384 58 8,870 96 Kyogle LGA within NSW.png
Lismore, City of 1879 (municipality)[84] 9 September 1946 (1946-09-09) 1,288 497 84 43,843 51 Lismore LGA.png
Richmond Valley Council February 2000 (2000-02) n/a 3,047 1,176 65 23,399 66 Richmond Valley LGA within NSW.png
Tweed Shire 1 January 1947 (1947-01-01) n/a 1,308 505 83 96,108 25 Tweed LGA within NSW.png

South East Region

Local government area Date
established
Area[22] Population[22] Map
km2 mi2 Rank (2018) Rank
Bega Valley Shire 1981[85] 6,279 2,424 scope="row"|35 34,348 58 Bega Valley LGA in NSW.png
Eurobodalla Shire 1913 3,428 1,324 59 38,288 56 Eurobodalla LGA in NSW.png
Goulburn Mulwaree Council 2004 3,220 1,240 64 30,852 60 Goulburn Mulwaree LGA in NSW.png
Hilltops Council 12 May 2016 (2016-05-12)[86] 7,141 2,757 32 18,782 71 Hilltops LGA in NSW.png
Queanbeyan–Palerang Regional Council 12 May 2016 (2016-05-12)[87] 5,319 2,054 42 59,959 41 Queanbeyan Palerang LGA in NSW.png
Snowy Monaro Regional Council 12 May 2016 (2016-05-12)[88] 15,164 5,855 10 20,733 69 Snowy Monaro LGA in NSW.png
Upper Lachlan Shire 17 March 2004[89] 7,127 2,752 scope="row"|33 7,961 98 Upper Lachlan LGA in NSW.png
Yass Valley Council 1 January 1980 (1980-01-01) (shire);
11 February 2004 (2004-02-11) (municipality)
3,995 1,542 53 16,953 73 Yass Valley LGA in NSW.png

Northern

Local government area Date
established
Area[22] Population[22] Map
km2 mi2 Rank (2018) Rank
Armidale Regional Council 12 May 2016 (2016-05-12) 8,621 3,329 26 30,707 61 Armidale LGA in NSW.png
Glen Innes Severn Council 15 September 2004
17 June 1872 (Municipal District of Glen Innes)[90]
5,480 2,120 41 8,908 95 Glenn Innes Severn LGA in NSW.png
Gunnedah Shire 19 September 1885
(Municipal District)[91]
4,987 1,925 45 12,661 85 Gunnedah LGA in NSW.png
Gwydir Shire 17 March 2004 (2004-03-17)[89] 9,260 3,580 scope="row"|22 5,349 112 Gwydir LGA in NSW.png
Inverell Shire 5 March 1872
(Municipal District)[92]
8,597 3,319 27 16,844 74 Inverell LGA in NSW.png
Liverpool Plains Shire 17 March 2004[89] 5,082 1,962 scope="row"|44 7,893 99 Liverpool Plains LGA in NSW.png
Moree Plains Shire 5 December 1890
(Municipal District of Moree)[93]
17,907 6,914 9 13,350 81 Moree Plains LGA.png
Narrabri Shire 28 September 1895
(Municipal District of West Narrabri)[94]
13,015 5,025 13 13,231 81 Narrabri LGA in NSW.png
Tamworth Regional Council 17 March 2004
(as Peel Regional)[89]
9,884 3,816 scope="row"|21 59,663 40 Tamworth Regional LGA in NSW.png
Tenterfield Shire 23 November 1871
(Municipal District)[95]
7,323 2,827 31 6,638 102 Tenterfield LGA in NSW.png
Uralla Shire 24 April 1882
(Municipal District)[96]
3,227 1,246 63 6,062 107 Uralla LGA in NSW.png
Walcha Shire 1 June 1955 (1955-06-01)[97] 6,261 2,417 36 3,132 120 Walcha LGA in NSW.png

Central West

Local government area Date established Area[22] Population[22] Map
Municipality / Shire City km2 mi2 Rank (2018) Rank
Bathurst Regional 26 May 2004 (2004-05-26)[63] n/a 3,818 1,474 55 43,206 52 Bathurst LGA in NSW.png
Blayney Shire 1 November 1882[98] n/a 1,525 589 80 7,342 100 Blayney LGA in NSW.png
Cabonne Shire 1 October 1977[99] n/a 6,022 2,325 37 13,680 80 Cabonne LGA in NSW.png
Cowra Shire 1980 (1980) n/a 2,829 1,092 67 12,767 84 Cowra LGA in NSW.png
Forbes Shire 4 June 1870[100] (as Municipal District) n/a 4,710 1,820 49 9,910 91 Forbes LGA in NSW.png
Lachlan Shire 6 March 1906[24] n/a 14,964 5,778 11 6,151 106 Lachlan LGA in NSW.png
Lithgow, City of 4 June 1889 (Municipality)[101] 21 December 1945[102] 4,512 1,742 51 21,636 68 Lithgow LGA in NSW.png
Mid-Western Regional 26 May 2004 (2004-05-26)[63] n/a 8,752 3,379 25 25,086 64 Mid-Western LGA in NSW.png
Oberon Shire 6 March 1906[24] n/a 3,625 1,400 57 5,408 111 Oberon LGA in NSW.png
Orange, City of 9 January 1860 (Municipality)[103] 10 July 1946 284 110 100 42,056 53 Orange LGA in NSW.png
Parkes Shire 1 March 1883 (as Municipal District)[104] n/a 5,958 2,300 38 14,894 77 Parkes LGA in NSW.png
Weddin Shire 6 March 1906[24] n/a 3,415 1,319 60 3,636 118 Weddin LGA in NSW.png

North Western

Local government area Date
established
Area[22] Population[22] Map
km2 mi2 Rank (2018) Rank
Bogan Shire 1891 (municipality); 1906 (shire)[24] 14,600 5,600 12 2,621 125 Bogan LGA in NSW.png
Bourke Shire 4 July 1878[105] 41,600 16,100 3 2,630 124 Bourke LGA in NSW.png
Brewarrina Shire 15 January 1901[106] 19,164 7,399 7 1,655 128 Brewarrina LGA in NSW.png
Cobar Shire 18 March 1884[107] 45,579 17,598 2 4,722 113 Cobar LGA in NSW.png
Coonamble Shire 3 May 1880[108] 9,916 3,829 20 4,014 116 Coonamble LGA in NSW.png
Dubbo Regional Council 12 May 2016 (2016-05-12)[109] 7,535 2,909 30 53,240 45 Dubbo Regional LGA in NSW.png
Gilgandra Shire 6 March 1906[24] 4,832 1,866 47 4,226 115 Gilgandra LGA in NSW.png
Narromine Shire 23 April 1898[110] 5,262 2,032 43 6,567 104 Narromine LGA in NSW.png
Walgett Shire 6 March 1906[24] 22,308 8,613 5 6,051 108 Walgett LGA in NSW.png
Warren Shire 24 April 1895[111] 10,754 4,152 17 2,745 123 Warren LGA in NSW.png
Warrumbungle Shire 25 August 2004[112] 12,372 4,777 scope="row"|14 9,399 92 Warrumbungle LGA in NSW.png

Far West

Local government area Date established Area[22] Population[22] Map
Municipality / Shire City km2 mi2 Rank (2018) Rank
Broken Hill, City of 24 September 1888[113] 170 66 106 17,734 72 Broken Hill LGA with NSW.png
Central Darling Shire 20 March 1959[114]
6 February 1883 (as Municipal District of Wilcannia)[115]
n/a 53,492 20,653 1 1,837 127 Central Darling LGA with NSW.png
Unincorporated Far West n/a 93,199 35,984 674 Unincorporated NSW LGA Map.png

Former local government areas in New South Wales

See also

References

  1. ^ "Special Article - The History of Government in New South Wales". New South Wales Year Book, 1998. Australian Bureau of Statistics, Australian Government. 7 March 2008. Retrieved 1 January 2017.
  2. ^ Kelly, A. H. (4–8 July 2011). The Development of Local Government in Australia, Focusing on NSW: From Road Builder to Planning Agency to Servant of the State Government and Developmentalism (Paper). World Planning Schools Congress 2011. Perth: University of Wollongong. Retrieved 1 January 2017.
  3. ^ a b c d e f g h i Tiley, Ian; Dollery, Brian (April 2010). "Local Government Amalgamation in New South Wales". Centre for Local Government. University of New England.
  4. ^ a b "Local Government Directory". Office of Local Government. Government of New South Wales. Retrieved 25 May 2016.
  5. ^ "4895 Royal Commission on Local Government Boundaries". State Records Archives Investigator. State Archives and Records Authority of New South Wales. Retrieved 2 November 2017.
  6. ^ Sansom, Graham; Munro, Jude; Inglis, Glenn (25 October 2013). "Revitalising Local Government: Final Report" (PDF). Independent Local Government Review Panel. Government of New South Wales. Retrieved 11 January 2015.
  7. ^ "Reform – Fit for the Future". Local Government NSW. 2015. Retrieved 11 January 2015.
  8. ^ Baird, Mike (22 April 2015). "Terms of Reference for a review of local council Fit for the Future proposals by an Expert Advisory Panel" (PDF) (Press release). NSW Independent Pricing and Regulatory Tribunal. Retrieved 15 November 2015.
  9. ^ Boxall, Peter J., AO; Jones, Catherine; Comrie, John (October 2015). "Assessment of Council Fit for the Future Proposals" (PDF). NSW Independent Pricing and Regulatory Tribunal. ISBN 978-1-925340-21-1. Retrieved 15 November 2015.CS1 maint: multiple names: authors list (link)
  10. ^ Baird, Mike; Toole, Paul (20 October 2015). "Fit for the future: $2 billion community windfall by merging unfit councils" (Press release). Government of New South Wales. Retrieved 15 November 2015.
  11. ^ "NSW councils to merge under State Government plan for forced amalgamations; 2016 elections delayed". ABC News. Retrieved 21 December 2015.
  12. ^ Kembrey, Melanie. "Council mergers: expert adviser Graham Sansom slams merger proposals". The Sydney Morning Herald. Retrieved 21 December 2015.
  13. ^ "Background". Council Boundary Review. Government of New South Wales. Retrieved 18 February 2016.
  14. ^ "Introduction". Stronger Councils. Government of New South Wales. 12 May 2016. Retrieved 12 May 2016.
  15. ^ "New councils for NSW". Family & Community Services (Press release). Government of New South Wales. 12 May 2016. Retrieved 12 May 2016.
  16. ^ "Local Government (Council Amalgamations) Proclamation 2016" (PDF). Stronger Councils. Government of New South Wales. Retrieved 12 May 2016.
  17. ^ Raper, Ashleigh (31 May 2016). "NSW council amalgamations: Strathfield, Burwood and Canada Bay merger stopped". ABC News. Australia. Retrieved 1 June 2016.
  18. ^ Davies, Anne (31 May 2016). "Council amalgamations: government push for mergers suffers setback". The Sydney Morning Herald. Retrieved 1 June 2016.
  19. ^ "Joint Organisation – Council Secure Portal". www.strongercouncils.nsw.gov.au.
  20. ^ Visentin, Lisa (22 December 2016). "Woollahra loses merger appeal, hints at High Court challenge". The Sydney Morning Herald. Retrieved 31 December 2016.
  21. ^ Blumer, Clare; Chettle, Nicole (27 July 2017). "NSW council amalgamations: Mayors fight to claw back court dollars after backflip on merger". ABC News. Australia. Retrieved 27 July 2017.
  22. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z "3218.0 – Regional Population Growth, Australia, 2017-18: Population Estimates by Local Government Area (ASGS 2018), 2017 to 2018". Australian Bureau of Statistics. Australian Bureau of Statistics. 27 March 2019. Retrieved 25 October 2019. Estimated resident population, 30 June 2018.
  23. ^ "Bayside Council". Stronger Councils. Government of New South Wales. 9 September 2016. Retrieved 9 September 2016.
  24. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t "Local Government (Shires) Act 1905 Proclamations". Government Gazette of the State of New South Wales (Sydney, NSW: 1901–2001). 7 March 1906. pp. 1593–1644. Retrieved 15 June 2018.
  25. ^ "Government Gazette Proclamations and Legislation - New South Wales Government Gazette (Sydney, NSW: 1832–1900) - 27 Mar 1874". nla.gov.au. Retrieved 3 March 2017.
  26. ^ "Government Gazette Proclamations and Legislation - New South Wales Government Gazette (Sydney, NSW: 1832–1900) - 6 Feb 1889". nla.gov.au. Retrieved 3 March 2017.
  27. ^ "Government Gazette Proclamations and Legislation - New South Wales Government Gazette (Sydney, NSW: 1832–1900) - 21 Jan 1882". nla.gov.au. Retrieved 3 March 2017.
  28. ^ "Government Gazette Proclamations and Legislation - New South Wales Government Gazette (Sydney, NSW: 1832–1900) - 11 Aug 1883". nla.gov.au. Retrieved 3 March 2017.
  29. ^ "Canterbury-Bankstown Council". Stronger Councils. Government of New South Wales. 12 May 2016. Retrieved 14 May 2016.
  30. ^ "Cumberland Council". Stronger Councils. Government of New South Wales. 12 May 2016. Retrieved 13 May 2016.
  31. ^ "Georges River Council". Stronger Councils. Government of New South Wales. 12 May 2016. Retrieved 15 May 2016.
  32. ^ "Municipality of Hunter's Hill - Proclamation - New South Wales Government Gazette (Sydney, NSW: 1832–1900) - 7 Jan 1861". Trove. Retrieved 1 October 2016.
  33. ^ "Inner West Council". Stronger Councils. Government of New South Wales. 12 May 2016. Retrieved 15 May 2016.
  34. ^ "Government Gazette Proclamations and Legislation - New South Wales Government Gazette (Sydney, NSW: 1832–1900) - 11 Feb 1895". nla.gov.au. Retrieved 3 March 2017.
  35. ^ "Government Gazette Proclamations and Legislation - New South Wales Government Gazette (Sydney, NSW: 1832–1900) - 11 Apr 1893". Trove. Retrieved 1 October 2016.
  36. ^ "Government Gazette Proclamations and Legislation - New South Wales Government Gazette (Sydney, NSW: 1832–1900) - 31 Jul 1890". Trove. Retrieved 1 October 2016.
  37. ^ "Northern Beaches Council". Stronger Councils. Government of New South Wales. 12 May 2016. Retrieved 12 May 2016.
  38. ^ "City of Parramatta Council". Stronger Councils. Government of New South Wales. 12 May 2016. Retrieved 15 May 2016.
  39. ^ "History of Local Government development in the Penrith and Surrounding Districts". Penrith City Council. 25 May 2009. Archived from the original on 22 June 2014.
  40. ^ "Municipality of Randwick - Proclamation - New South Wales Government Gazette (Sydney, NSW: 1832–1900) - 23 Feb 1859". nla.gov.au. Retrieved 3 March 2017.
  41. ^ "History of Sydney City Council" (PDF). City of Sydney. Archived from the original (PDF) on 3 December 2012. Retrieved 9 February 2007.
  42. ^ "Proclamation of the incorporation of the district of Waverley as a Municipality". NSW Government Gazette No. 115, 16 June 1859, folios 1343–1344. 16 June 1859.
  43. ^ "Municipality of North Willoughby - Proclamation - New South Wales Government Gazette (Sydney, NSW: 1832–1900) - 25 Oct 1865". nla.gov.au. Retrieved 3 March 2017.
  44. ^ "Local Government Act 1919 - Proclamation - Government Gazette of the State of New South Wales (Sydney, NSW: 1901–2001) - 17 Nov 1989". nla.gov.au. Retrieved 3 March 2017.
  45. ^ Jarvis & Kelly (1960). The History of Woollahra. Sydney: Halstead Press.
  46. ^ "Overview of the Council". Introduction to Blue Mountains City Council. Blue Mountains City Council. Retrieved 5 May 2016.
  47. ^ "Government Gazette Proclamations and Legislation - New South Wales Government Gazette (Sydney, NSW: 1832–1900) - 11 Nov 1886". Trove. Retrieved 1 October 2016.
  48. ^ "Central Coast Council". Stronger Councils. Government of New South Wales. 12 May 2016. Retrieved 14 May 2016.
  49. ^ "Hawkesbury City Council - Overview". Hawkesbury City Council. 2017. Retrieved 6 July 2017.
  50. ^ a b "Local Government Act, 1919—Proclamation - Government Gazette of the State of New South Wales (Sydney, NSW: 1901–2001) - 30 Nov 1956". nla.gov.au. Retrieved 3 March 2017.
  51. ^ "Government Gazette of New South Wales" (PDF). NSW Legislation. 25 February 2004.
  52. ^ "Local Government Act 1919—Proclamation - Government Gazette of the State of New South Wales (Sydney, NSW: 1901–2001) - 1 May 1987". nla.gov.au. Retrieved 3 March 2017.
  53. ^ "Government Gazette Proclamations and Legislation - New South Wales Government Gazette (Sydney, NSW: 1832–1900) - 11 Jun 1886". nla.gov.au. Retrieved 3 March 2017.
  54. ^ "Proclamation - Government Gazette of the State of New South Wales (Sydney, NSW: 1901–2001) - 15 Dec 1915". nla.gov.au. Retrieved 3 March 2017.
  55. ^ "History of the Council". Port Macquarie-Hastings Council. 28 February 2008. Archived from the original on 27 March 2012. Retrieved 26 March 2008.
  56. ^ Nichols 2006, pp. 107–108
  57. ^ Australian Bureau of Statistics (27 June 2017). "Lord Howe Island (State Suburb)". 2016 Census QuickStats. Retrieved 7 July 2017. Edit this at Wikidata
  58. ^ "MUNICIPALITY OF ALBURY". New South Wales Government Gazette (Sydney, NSW : 1832 - 1900). 8 June 1859. p. 1294. Retrieved 30 December 2019.
  59. ^ "Albury and District Historical Society". Research and references. Albury City Council. Archived from the original on 23 July 2008. Retrieved 8 July 2008.
  60. ^ "Government Gazette Proclamations and Legislation". New South Wales Government Gazette (Sydney, NSW : 1832 - 1900). 27 September 1882. p. 5063. Retrieved 30 December 2019.
  61. ^ "Edward River Council". Stronger Councils. Government of New South Wales. 12 May 2016. Retrieved 18 May 2016.
  62. ^ "Federation Council". Stronger Councils. Government of New South Wales. 12 May 2016. Retrieved 13 May 2016.
  63. ^ a b c d "Government Gazette of New South Wales" (PDF). NSW Legislation. 26 May 2004. Retrieved 30 December 2019.
  64. ^ "Murray River Council". Stronger Councils. Government of New South Wales. 12 May 2016. Retrieved 13 May 2016.
  65. ^ "Wentworth - A Brief History". Wentworth Shire Council. Retrieved 16 February 2020.
  66. ^ "Local Government Act, 1919—Proclamation". Government Gazette of the State of New South Wales (Sydney, NSW: 1901–2001). 5 November 1943. p. 1932. Retrieved 20 June 2018.
  67. ^ "Gundagai Council". Stronger Councils. Government of New South Wales. 12 May 2016. Archived from the original on 11 June 2016. Retrieved 21 May 2016.
  68. ^ "LOCAL GOVERNMENT ACT, 1919.—PROCLAMATION". Government Gazette of the State of New South Wales (Sydney, NSW : 1901 - 2001). 13 November 1964. p. 3592. Retrieved 30 December 2019.
  69. ^ "Government Gazette Proclamations and Legislation". New South Wales Government Gazette (Sydney, NSW: 1832–1900). 27 July 1886. p. 4993. Retrieved 20 June 2018.
  70. ^ "Irrigation Act, 1912–1926". Government Gazette of the State of New South Wales (Sydney, NSW: 1901–2001). 6 January 1928. p. 42. Retrieved 20 June 2018.
  71. ^ "Murrumbidgee Council". Stronger Councils. Government of New South Wales. 12 May 2016. Retrieved 13 May 2016.
  72. ^ "Snowy Valley Council". Stronger Councils. Government of New South Wales. 12 May 2016. Retrieved 13 May 2016.
  73. ^ "Government Gazette Proclamations and Legislation - New South Wales Government Gazette (Sydney, NSW: 1832–1900) - 15 Mar 1870". nla.gov.au. Retrieved 3 March 2017.
  74. ^ "Greater Newcastle metropolitan planning". www.planning.nsw.gov.au. Retrieved 25 September 2018.
  75. ^ "Proclamation - Government Gazette of the State of New South Wales (Sydney, NSW: 1901–2001) - 7 Mar 1906". nla.gov.au. Retrieved 3 March 2017.
  76. ^ "Government Gazette Proclamations and Legislation - New South Wales Government Gazette (Sydney, NSW: 1832–1900) - 16 May 1893". nla.gov.au. Retrieved 3 March 2017.
  77. ^ "Local Government Act, 1919 — Proclamation – Government Gazette of the State of New South Wales (Sydney, NSW: 1901–2001) - 7 Dec 1945". nla.gov.au. Retrieved 3 March 2017.
  78. ^ "Mid-Coast Council". Stronger Councils. Government of New South Wales. 12 May 2016. Retrieved 12 May 2016.
  79. ^ "Government Gazette Proclamations and Legislation". New South Wales Government Gazette (Sydney, NSW: 1832–1900). 13 April 1870. p. 859. Retrieved 20 June 2018.
  80. ^ "Municipality of Newcastle - Proclamation - New South Wales Government Gazette (Sydney, NSW: 1832–1900) - 8 Jun 1859". nla.gov.au. Retrieved 3 March 2017.
  81. ^ "Government Gazette Proclamations and Legislation". New South Wales Government Gazette (Sydney, NSW: 1832–1900). 26 January 1848. p. 121. Retrieved 15 June 2018.
  82. ^ "Municipal Institutions - Municipality of Singleton. Proclamation - New South Wales Government Gazette (Sydney, NSW: 1832–1900) - 2 Feb 1866". nla.gov.au. Retrieved 3 March 2017.
  83. ^ "Local Government Act, 1919 — Proclamation". Government Gazette of the State of New South Wales (Sydney, NSW: 1901–2001). 13 July 1979. p. 3356. Retrieved 15 June 2018.
  84. ^ "Historical information about the City of Lismore". City of Lismore. 2016. Retrieved 28 May 2016.
  85. ^ "LOCAL GOVERNMENT ACT, 1919.—PROCLAMATION". Government Gazette of the State of New South Wales (Sydney, NSW : 1901 - 2001). 17 October 1980. p. 5393. Retrieved 29 December 2019.
  86. ^ "Hilltops Council". Stronger Councils. Government of New South Wales. 12 May 2016. Retrieved 13 May 2016.
  87. ^ "Queanbeyan-Palerang Regional Council". Stronger Councils. Government of New South Wales. 12 May 2016. Retrieved 13 May 2016.
  88. ^ "Snowy Monaro Regional Council". Stronger Councils. Government of New South Wales. 12 May 2016. Retrieved 13 May 2016.
  89. ^ a b c d "Government Gazette of New South Wales" (PDF). NSW Legislation. 17 March 2004. Retrieved 30 December 2019.
  90. ^ "Government Gazette Proclamations and Legislation". New South Wales Government Gazette (Sydney, NSW: 1832–1900). 17 June 1872. p. 1563. Retrieved 20 June 2018.
  91. ^ "Government Gazette Proclamations and Legislation - New South Wales Government Gazette (Sydney, NSW: 1832–1900) - 19 Sep 1885". Trove. Retrieved 1 October 2016.
  92. ^ "PROCLAMATION. - By His Excellency Sir Alfred Stephen, Knight, a Companion of the Most Honorable Order of the Bath, Chief Justice of the Colony of New South Wales, Administering the Government thereof. - New South Wales Government Gazette (Sydney, NSW: 1832–1900) - 5 Mar 1872". nla.gov.au. Retrieved 3 March 2017.
  93. ^ "Government Gazette Proclamations and Legislation - New South Wales Government Gazette (Sydney, NSW: 1832–1900) - 5 Dec 1890". nla.gov.au. Retrieved 3 March 2017.
  94. ^ "Government Gazette Proclamations and Legislation". New South Wales Government Gazette (Sydney, NSW: 1832–1900). 28 September 1895. p. 6307. Retrieved 15 June 2018.
  95. ^ "Government Gazette Proclamations and Legislation - New South Wales Government Gazette (Sydney, NSW: 18321900) - 23 Nov 1871". nla.gov.au. Retrieved 3 March 2017.
  96. ^ "Government Gazette Proclamations and Legislation - New South Wales Government Gazette (Sydney, NSW: 1832–1900) - 24 Apr 1882". nla.gov.au. Retrieved 3 March 2017.
  97. ^ Walcha 100 years of Local Government. Walcha: Walcha Shire Council. 1989.
  98. ^ "Government Gazette Proclamations and Legislation - New South Wales Government Gazette (Sydney, NSW: 1832–1900) - 1 Nov 1882". nla.gov.au. Retrieved 3 March 2017.
  99. ^ "LOCAL GOVERNMENT ACT, 1919.—PROCLAMATION". Government Gazette of the State of New South Wales (Sydney, NSW : 1901 - 2001). 29 July 1977. p. 3184. Retrieved 30 December 2019.
  100. ^ "Government Gazette Proclamations and Legislation - New South Wales Government Gazette (Sydney, NSW: 1832–1900) - 4 Jun 1870". nla.gov.au. Retrieved 3 March 2017.
  101. ^ "Government Gazette Proclamations and Legislation - New South Wales Government Gazette (Sydney, NSW: 1832–1900) - 4 Jun 1889". nla.gov.au. Retrieved 3 March 2017.
  102. ^ "Local Government Act, 1919 — Proclamation – Government Gazette of the State of New South Wales (Sydney, NSW: 1901–2001) - 21 Dec 1945". nla.gov.au. Retrieved 3 March 2017.
  103. ^ "Municipality of Orange - Proclamation - New South Wales Government Gazette (Sydney, NSW: 1832–1900) - 9 Jan 1860". nla.gov.au. Retrieved 3 March 2017.
  104. ^ "Government Gazette Proclamations and Legislation - New South Wales Government Gazette (Sydney, NSW: 1832–1900) - 1 Mar 1883". nla.gov.au. Retrieved 3 March 2017.
  105. ^ "Government Gazette Proclamations and Legislation - New South Wales Government Gazette (Sydney, NSW: 1832–1900) - 4 Jul 1878". nla.gov.au. Retrieved 3 March 2017.
  106. ^ "Proclamation - Government Gazette of the State of New South Wales (Sydney, NSW: 1901–2001) - 15 Jan 1901". nla.gov.au. Retrieved 3 March 2017.
  107. ^ "Government Gazette Proclamations and Legislation - New South Wales Government Gazette (Sydney, NSW: 1832–1900) - 18 Mar 1884". Trove. Retrieved 1 October 2016.
  108. ^ "Government Gazette Proclamations and Legislation - New South Wales Government Gazette (Sydney, NSW: 1832–1900) - 3 May 1880". nla.gov.au. Retrieved 3 March 2017.
  109. ^ "Western Plains Regional Council". Stronger Councils. Government of New South Wales. 12 May 2016. Archived from the original on 11 June 2016. Retrieved 17 May 2016.
  110. ^ "Proclamation - New South Wales Government Gazette (Sydney, NSW: 1832–1900) - 23 Apr 1898". nla.gov.au. Retrieved 3 March 2017.
  111. ^ "Government Gazette Proclamations and Legislation - New South Wales Government Gazette (Sydney, NSW: 1832–1900) - 24 Apr 1895". nla.gov.au. Retrieved 3 March 2017.
  112. ^ "Government Gazette of New South Wales" (PDF). NSW Legislation. 25 August 2004. Retrieved 30 December 2019.
  113. ^ "Government Gazette Proclamations and Legislation - New South Wales Government Gazette (Sydney, NSW: 1832–1900) - 24 Sep 1888". nla.gov.au. Retrieved 3 March 2017.
  114. ^ "Local Government Act, 1919 — Proclamation – Government Gazette of the State of New South Wales (Sydney, NSW: 1901–2001) - 20 Mar 1959". nla.gov.au. Retrieved 3 March 2017.
  115. ^ "Government Gazette Proclamations and Legislation - New South Wales Government Gazette (Sydney, NSW: 1832–1900) - 6 Feb 1883". nla.gov.au. Retrieved 3 March 2017.

External links