Huskisson, New South Wales

Huskisson is a town in New South Wales, Australia in the City of Shoalhaven, on the shores of Jervis Bay.[2][3] It is 24 km south-east of Nowra.

Geography

Situated alongside Currambene Creek which also serves as an anchorage and fishing port. Huskisson is a prime tourist destination owing to its white sands and emerald waters (although Hyams Beach to the south is known to have finer white sands).[4]

The town is bounded by Currambene Creek in the north, Moona Moona Creek in the south, the Jervis Bay shoreline and its beaches in the east, and Jervis Bay National Park in the west.

Etymology

Huskisson was named by Governor Sir George Gipps, after the British statesman William Huskisson.[5]

Demographics

At the 2016 census, the population of the State Suburb of Huskisson was 786.[1]

History

Aboriginal History

The traditional owners of the area around Huskisson were a group of the Yuin. Well into the C20th, members of what local settlers called 'the Jervis Bay tribe' lived on the bank of Currambene Creek.[6][7][8][9] The 'Jervis Bay tribe' are also known as the Wandandian people,[10][11] who spoke Dharamba,[12] which was probably the northernmost dialect of the Dhurga language.[13][14] Huskisson lay very close to the linquistic boundary between the Dharamba dialect[15] and the Thurawal language[16] and the southern end of the traditional lands of the Thurawal people.

Origin of Huskisson

The origin of Huskisson dates to the early 1840s. The land south of Moona Moona Creek – now Vincentia - was the site of the settlement of South Huskisson, founded in 1841 as a seaport and terminus of The Wool Road. South Huskisson lay on land originally owned by Edward Deas Thompson[17] and was a ‘private town’.

The land to the north of Moona Moona Creek was a ‘government reserve”. When South Huskisson was planned, it was envisaged that the land north of Moona Moona Creek would become a ‘government township’.[18] Allotments were sold both in South Huskisson (in 1841)[19][20] and in the new 'government township' of Huskisson (in Feb.1843).[21]

South Huskisson was not a success and was in rapid decline by 1850. Consequently, the 'government township' of Huskisson failed to develop. By the mid-1850s, town allotments in both Huskisson and South Huskisson were essentially worthless.[22]

Huskisson only began to grow, when it became the site of shipbuilding in the early 1860s. In its early years, Huskisson was often referred to as ‘North Huskisson’ reverting to Huskisson, once the ruins of its privately-owned southern twin town – by then referred to as ‘the Old Township’ - had all but disappeared.

Shipbuilding

From 1864 to 1977, at least 131 registered wooden-hulled vessels[23] were built in Huskisson, in shipyards along Currumbene Creek. That number does not include the many unregistered wooden-hulled vessels - such as small boats, punts, barges, and timber lighters - that were also built there during that period.[24]

The shipyards built sailing vessels and steamships, including schooners, tug-boats, island-trading ships - for the firm of W.R. Carpenter & Co., during the 1930s and 1940s - and two passenger ferries for Sydney (Lady Denman in 1911 and Lady Scott in 1914).[23]

Up until the late 1940s, vessels were built using the ‘work frame’ method in which frames were created using timber from natural crooks in trees (not bent using steam as is more common now). Until 1940, the town had no electricity; all vessels were built without power tools, other than a steam-operated saw-mill used to make planks. Timber was locally sourced, generally from within a few miles of the town.[25]

During the Second World War, the Huskisson shipyard built four wooden-hulled vessels for the American Army, for use in the New Guinea campaign. Aftter the war, the old shipbuilding techniques gave way to more modern methods and in later years most vessels built were wooden-hulled fishing trawlers.

The main shipyard owners were, in earlier years, the Dent family,[26] and later the Setree family.[27][28]

Services & Facilities

During the early days of the settlement, a post office operated at 'Huskisson', from January 1843 up to the end of December 1855.[29] A post office opened in Huskisson in November 1875.[30] By 1875, the ‘North Huskisson’ school was in operation.[31] A telephone exchange opened in November 1912.[32] In 1940, the town was connected to electricity.[33]

There was a ‘Government Wharf used by the Illawarra Steam Navigation Company.

Tourism

By the 1890s, Huskisson began to be a holiday destination. The Dent family opened the Jervis Bay Hotel in 1893 and operated guesthouses on the beachfront.[34]

Heritage listings

Panorama of Currambene Creek, Huskisson, NSW

Huskisson has a number of heritage-listed sites, including:

Notable people from Huskisson

References

  1. ^ a b Australian Bureau of Statistics (27 June 2017). "Huskisson (State Suburb)". 2016 Census QuickStats. Retrieved 9 July 2017. Edit this at Wikidata
  2. ^ "Huskisson". Geographical Names Register (GNR) of NSW. Geographical Names Board of New South Wales. Retrieved 14 August 2017. Edit this at Wikidata
  3. ^ "Huskisson". OpenStreetMap. Retrieved 14 August 2017.
  4. ^ Gazing onto the world's whitest sand, SMH, 31 December 2005.
  5. ^ "Huskisson". Geographical Names Register (GNR) of NSW. Geographical Names Board of New South Wales. Retrieved 7 October 2009. Edit this at Wikidata
  6. ^ "ABORIGINAL QUEEN DIES NEAR NOWRA MORE THAN 100 YEARS OLD". Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954). 27 February 1928. p. 11. Retrieved 26 February 2019.
  7. ^ "An Interesting Character". Nowra Leader (NSW : 1909 - 1939). 6 May 1927. p. 3. Retrieved 26 February 2019.
  8. ^ Crittenden, Madeline (24 October 2018). "Aboriginal 'King of Jervis Bay' believed to be buried at Husky Church". South Coast Register. Retrieved 26 February 2019.
  9. ^ "Photograph: King of Jervis Bay and his wife Mary, Nowra, New South Wales, approximately 1905". nla.gov.au. Retrieved 26 February 2019.
  10. ^ Organ, Michael (1990). "Illawarra and South Coast Aborigines 1770-1850". Aboriginal Education Unit Wollongong University. p. 401. ISBN 086418 112 4.
  11. ^ Tindale, N.B. (1974). Aboriginal Tribes of Australia. Berkeley: University of California Press.
  12. ^ "S56: Dharamba". collection.aiatsis.gov.au. Retrieved 28 February 2019.
  13. ^ Eades, Diana (1976). The Dharawal and Dhurga languages of the New South Wales South Coast. Canberra: Australian Institute of Aboriginal Studies. pp. 4, 5, 6. ISBN 0855750510. OCLC 2948202.
  14. ^ "S53: Dhurga". collection.aiatsis.gov.au. Retrieved 27 February 2019.
  15. ^ "Dharamba | Indigenous Languages". indigenous.sl.nsw.gov.au. Retrieved 28 February 2019.
  16. ^ "Dharawal | Indigenous Languages". indigenous.sl.nsw.gov.au. Retrieved 28 February 2019.
  17. ^ "Classified Advertising". Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (NSW : 1803 - 1842). 5 July 1834. p. 4. Retrieved 18 December 2018.
  18. ^ "Sketch of the township of South Huskisson [cartographic material]". nla.gov.au. Retrieved 8 December 2018.
  19. ^ "SOUTH HUSKISSON—JERVIS BAY". Sydney Monitor and Commercial Advertiser (NSW : 1838 - 1841). 18 June 1841. p. 3. Retrieved 16 January 2019.
  20. ^ "Classified Advertising". Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (NSW : 1803 - 1842). 27 November 1841. p. 3. Retrieved 8 December 2018.
  21. ^ "SALE OF TOWN ALLOTMENTS". Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954). 18 January 1843. p. 4. Retrieved 26 February 2019.
  22. ^ "JERVIS BAY". Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954). 12 March 1856. p. 8. Retrieved 14 January 2019.
  23. ^ a b Bridget., Sant (2012). Huskisson's ships and their builders : 1861-1977. Lady Denman Heritage Complex., Weston Print.). [Huskisson, N.S.W.]: Lady Denman Heritage Complex. pp. 42–51. ISBN 0958644780. OCLC 824565005.
  24. ^ Bridget., Sant (2012). Huskisson's ships and their builders : 1861-1977. Lady Denman Heritage Complex., Weston Print.). [Huskisson, N.S.W.]: Lady Denman Heritage Complex. p. 34. ISBN 0958644780. OCLC 824565005.
  25. ^ Bridget., Sant (2012). Huskisson's ships and their builders : 1861-1977. Lady Denman Heritage Complex., Weston Print.). [Huskisson, N.S.W.]: Lady Denman Heritage Complex. pp. 26–31. ISBN 0958644780. OCLC 824565005.
  26. ^ Bridget., Sant (2012). Huskisson's ships and their builders : 1861-1977. Lady Denman Heritage Complex., Weston Print.). [Huskisson, N.S.W.]: Lady Denman Heritage Complex. pp. 14–20. ISBN 0958644780. OCLC 824565005.
  27. ^ Bridget., Sant (2012). Huskisson's ships and their builders : 1861-1977. Lady Denman Heritage Complex., Weston Print.). [Huskisson, N.S.W.]: Lady Denman Heritage Complex. pp. 21–25. ISBN 0958644780. OCLC 824565005.
  28. ^ "AR Settree". arhv.anmm.gov.au. Retrieved 2 March 2019.
  29. ^ Huskisson Post Office History. Copy held in National Library of Australia: Australian Postal Commission. pp. 1, 2.
  30. ^ Huskisson Post Office History. Copy held in National Library of Australia: Australian Postal Commission. p. 6.
  31. ^ Huskisson Post Office History. Copy held in National Library of Australia.: Australian Postal Commission. p. 5.
  32. ^ Huskisson Post Office History. Copy held in National Library of Australia: Australian Postal Commission. p. 23.
  33. ^ Bridget., Sant (2012). Huskisson's ships and their builders : 1861-1977. Lady Denman Heritage Complex., Weston Print.). [Huskisson, N.S.W.]: Lady Denman Heritage Complex. p. 23. ISBN 0958644780. OCLC 824565005.
  34. ^ Bridget., Sant (2012). Huskisson's ships and their builders : 1861-1977. Lady Denman Heritage Complex., Weston Print.). [Huskisson, N.S.W.]: Lady Denman Heritage Complex. p. 15. ISBN 0958644780. OCLC 824565005.
  35. ^ "Lady Denman (M.V.)". New South Wales State Heritage Register. Office of Environment and Heritage. H01518. Retrieved 18 May 2018.
  36. ^ "Paul Greene". ArtistTrove. Retrieved 15 December 2015.

External links